Civil War - Where They Rest . . .

by Barb Hyde, November, 2011

A-I J-Z (Veterans Index) Medal of Honor Cemeteries

I never could have taken all of these photos.
Many thanks to all of the people who have so graciously, even enthusiastically, allowed me to use their photos.

Note for use: click on links to go directly to more information. Click on any small photo to open a full-size photo.

Cold Harbor VA National Cemetery



Photo by Charles Troy, Jr.

Cold Harbor is about 10 miles northeast of the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia. The Battle of Cold Harbor (May 31-June 3, 1864) is remembered as one of American history's bloodiest, most lopsided battles. It was the final victory won by Lee's army during the war. Union strength was 108,000 against 59,000 entrenched and fortified Confederates. Union casualties were 1844 killed, 9,077 wounded and 1816 captured or missing. The battle brought the count of Union casualties for the last 30 days to a total of more than 52,000. Potter Countians fought here in Company G and D, 53rd PA Inf and Company G, 46th PA Inf.



Cold Harbor was one of six battles that are all part of the assault on Richmond, VA in 1864. The 149th and the 53rd fought - and Potter County men died - in all of them. The others are: Seven Pines, Richmond, Glendale, City Point, and Fort Harrison. All of these sites have National Cemeteries and in each rests at least a few of Potter County's soldiers. Between May 1 and July 31, 1864, the 149th regiment lost 444 killed, wounded, or captured some of them from Potter County.

From letter written by Albert Harvey: Our company [Co G, 149th] has lost very heavy, more so that any other in the regiment. We went in with 63 men and I believe there is 16 left.

The Cold Harbor National Cemetery was established in 1866. At 1.4 acres, it is one of the smallest National Cemeteries. When the Federal Reburial Program filled the cemetery, the overflow were buried in the larger Richmond National Cemetery.

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier commemorates 889 unknown Union dead who were buried in trench graves. The Pennsylvania Monument, built in 1909, was erected by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to commemorate the losses of its regiments that fought at Cold Harbor in 1864. The dedication ceremony, 45 years later lasted six days and was attended by 690 of 937 surviving veterans of these troops.

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Culpeper VA National Cemetery


Photo Wikipedia

An artillery tube has been made into a monument with this inscription:

UNITED STATES NATIONAL MILITARY CEMETERY
CULPEPER, VIRGINIA
ESTABLISHED APRIL 1867
INTERMENTS 1350
KNOWN 448
UNKNOWN 902

 


Photo by Barrie Mathason
Pennsylvania Memorial and graves of PA soldiers.

PENNSYLVANIA
REMEMBERS WITH SOLOMN PRIDE
HER HEROIC SONS
WHO HERE REPOSE IN
KNOWN AND UNKNOWN GRAVES.

MAY THEIR SACRIFICES BE
AN INSPIRATION TO THE PEOPLE
AND PROMOTE CIVIC VIRTUE, LOVE OF
LIBERTY, PEACE, PROSPERITY
AND HAPPINESS IN ALL THE STATES.

DULCE ET DECORUM EST
PRO PATRIA MORT.


From 1862-65, many battles waged in this region between the two capitals - Washington D. C. and Richmond VA, just 100 miles to the south. Among them were the Battle of Cedar Mountain on Aug. 9, 1862, and the Battle of Chancellorsville, April 30 through May 6, 1863. So great was the loss of life on both sides during these battles that many consider them to be the fiercest fighting of the war.

After every battle, many wounded soldiers died in field or military hospitals. Most were buried where they fell or were interred in makeshift graves around encampments or hospitals.

As a result of the National Cemetery Act of 1862 and the number of scattered Union dead in the vicinity, Culpeper National Cemetery was established in 1867. The cemetery covers 16 acres. It originally contained six burial sections, one of which was set aside for the graves of 912 unknown soldiers of the Civil War.

Inscription on a memorial plaque that marks the sections that contain the graves of unknown Civil War soldiers:

CIVIL WAR SOLDIERS WERE ORIGINALLY BURIED WHERE THEY BRAVELY FOUGHT AND DIED DURING BATTLES AT CEDAR MOUNTAIN, TREVILIANS STATION, GORDONSVILLE, BRANDY STATION AND SURROUNDING AREA. FOLLOWING THE CIVIL WAR, THE REMAINS OF 912 SOLDIERS WHOSE NAMES ARE UNKNOWN WERE REINTERRED HERE IN SECTIONS C AND D.

PRESENTED BY
VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS OF THE UNITED STATES,
BURTON HAMMOND POST 2524
1988

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 Last Update November 11, 2011


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