TOWN OF FRANKLINVILLE

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES FROM: "HISTORICAL GAZETTEER AND BIOGRAPHICAL MEMORIAL of CATTARAUGUS COUNTY, NY, ed by WILLIAM ADAMS, Published 1893
 
 

Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 646

Surnames: ADAMS, BUNTING, ROOT

George ADAMS was a native of London, England, and came to Humphrey in this county in 1830. He was born Jan. 16, 1805 and died Oct. 27, 1890, residing in Sugartown for sixty years. His wife was Mary BUNTING, also a native of England; she died March 28, 1874. Of their five children two, Sarah (Mrs. Warren S. ROOT) and George W., are living.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 646

Surnames: ANTISDALE, COON, STORRS, LINDSAY, PATTERSON, OAKES

Moses ANTISDALE came to Franklinville from Cherry Valley, N. Y., in 1829, and settled on lot 45, previously purchased. He finally sold out and moved into Morgan hollow, where he resided until his wife's death in 1860. He married Nancy COON, of Cherry Valley, previous to coming to this town. Children: Mary J. (Mrs. G. C. STORRS), Diantha (Mrs. Walter LINDSAY), Willard, Sarah Ann, Louisa (Mrs. William PATTERSON), Anna (Mrs. John OAKES), and Luther S. Mr. ANTISDALE and Luther went to Illinois in 1860. In 1861 Luther enlisted in Co. A, 2d Ill. Cav., and was soon promoted orderly, in which capacity he served until General Oglesby was mortally wounded at Corinth, Oct. 3, 1862. After General Oglesby's death he served under Gen. John A. Logan. He was in many battles along the Mississippi, including Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Pittsburg Landing, Corinth, and Vicksburg, through all of which he passed without a wound, but afterward died of intermittent fever in the military hospital at New Orleans in the fall of 1863. Moses ANTISDALE enlisted a few months later and received an injury on board a gunboat at the siege of Fort Donelson, in consequence of which he was discharged and died aboard the cars on his way home, in April, 1862.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 646

Surnames: BARD, FREEMAN, PATTERSON

Robert BARD came to Farmersville from Herkimer county in November, 1816, and settled on what is now known as the FREEMAN farm. He married a daughter of Ashbel FREEMAN and had four children. Mr. BARD came to the village of Franklinville in 1829, having traded his farm with John PATTERSON for property where now stands the Globe Hotel, where he kept hotel 26 years.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 646

Surnames: BOND, CARPENTER, SEARL

Marshall O. BOND is a son of Ora and Laura (CARPENTER) BOND and was born June 26, 1828. January 1, 1852, he married Hannah SEARL, of Franklinville, and settled in the village, where he engaged with his father in harness making. In July, 1862, Mr. BOND enlisted in Co. D, 154th N. Y. Vols., as first lieutenant, and resigned in 1863 on account of sickness. A number of years were spent in the oil country and upon returning to this town he engaged in farming. Children: Ida E., Adda M., Hanford S., and Kate G. Ora BOND, the father of Marshall O., was supervisor of Farmersville in 1829-30 and again in 1840.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 646

Surnames: BOYCE, BLOODGOOD, DAY, BUCK, LITCHFIELD, VAUGHAN

James F. BOYCE, born in Worcester, Mass., March 1, 1795, came to this county in 1823. He kept bachelor's hall in the woods two years and then married Elizabeth BLOODGOOD, from Herkimer, N. Y., the ceremony being performed by Israel DAY, J. P., of Franklinville. The couple located on Bear creek, two miles farther into the forest than any other settlers, and remained there seven years. They then came to this town and settled on lot 32, on BOYCE hill, where he resided until his death Jan. 12, 1864. His wife died April 5, 1885. Children: Louisa H. (Mrs. Ezra BUCK), David F., Almira C. (Mrs. Harvey LITCHFIELD), Nancy E., Amy L., and Mary A. Z. (Mrs. Joseph VAUGHAN).

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 646 & 647

Surnames: BURROWS, ROCKWELL, ALGER, SQUIRE

David BURROWS, a Vermonter by birth, at the age of eighteen came with his father to Gainesville, N. Y., and in 1840 removed to Franklinville, settling in Cadiz, where he commenced shoemaking. His wife was Orrilla ROCKWELL, who bore him five children, of whom three are living: Jasper A., Lucinda M. (Mrs. D. ALGER), and George W. Mrs. BURROWS died July 9, 1855 and Mr. BURROWS on March 31, 1885. Jasper A. BURROWS was born Oct. 28, 1843, and married Candace, daughter of Edward C. SQUIRE; two children: Dora A. and Edward C.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 647

Surnames: BUTLER, LYON, NAPIER, HOWARD

Samuel BUTLER, son of Nathan, came with his wife, Phebe LYON, from Otsego county to Franklinville in 1820. Two years afterward he bought seventy-five acres of wild land in Farmersville, whither he moved and erected a frame house. He was a carpenter and joiner by trade. A few years later he returned to this town and purchased the farm and built the stone house where John NAPIER now lives. Of his four children two are living: Eliza A. (Mrs. HOWARD) and Lewis L.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 647-649

Surnames: BUTTON, DUNCAN, TEN BROECK

Jonas K. BUTTON was born in Machias on the 3d of May, 1821. His father, Charles, was a pioneer farmer, and the early life of Mr. BUTTON was passed on the farm with a large family of brothers and sisters, and his stalwart frame was inured to the severe toil which was the lot of the "tiller of the soil" in the primitive history of the county. His father died in 1832 and the duties of the farm so occupied the attention of the children that the education of Mr. BUTTON was restricted to a few winter terms of school in the log school house, but that temple of learning has been the source of inspiration to the men who have risen to prominence in western New York. After attaining the age of eighteen years he worked out at farm work by the month during the summer season and taught school during the winter months. He early acquired habits of thrift and economy and was particular to add to his savings each year, knowing that this course was the only one that insured the attainment of a competence. He was never afflicted with the modern mania of becoming suddenly rich, but preferred to acquire his accumulations by ceaseless energy and in business where his ripe judgment could be of service to him. On the 27th of Sept., 1845, he was married to Jane M. DUNCAN, and together they began life in the employ of Judge Peter TEN BROECK, of Farmersville, and that rare judge of men at once appreciated the merit of the young couple, and their friendship continued unabated until the death of Judge TEN BROECK.

In 1847 Mr. BUTTON purchased and moved onto a farm about three miles south of the village of Franklinville, and which has ever since been known as "the BUTTON farm" and is now owned by his youngest son and namesake, who, at twenty-two, is proving himself a "chip of the old block" in representing the town as supervisor. Mr. BUTTON was early ambitious to excel as a farmer and like his early patron, Judge TEN BROECK, to become a large landed proprietor, and so well was his ambition gratified that at his death he owned 2,100 acres of farming land in the county of Cattaraugus, being the largest owner of tillable land within its borders. This land comprised six farms well stocked and under an excellent state of cultivation. In 1864 he took up his residence in the village of Franklinville and thereafter leased his farms. Mr. BUTTON was the model landlord. He was unerring in his estimate of men, understood well when his farms were properly carried on, and while fair and considerate to his tenants was strict and exacting in requiring them to care for his stock and maintain his farms in good condition. His relations with his tenants were close and kindly, and he seldom was obliged to change them, and his leaseholds were profitable alike to him and his lessees.

When the cheese industry by factory-making first started Mr. BUTTON erected a factory between Franklinville and Cadiz and another west of Cadiz, and they were the nucleus of a combination that has become celebrated. For many years he attended to the financial management of this combination, selling the cheese and distributing the proceeds, and his excellent judgment and methodical habits prevented criticism as to his performance of this trust. Mr. BUTTON early took an interest in politics and was soon recognized as one of the leaders of his party in the county. He was an uncompromising Democrat, zealous in defending the principles of his party, and a partisan in practice. He was supervisor of Franklinville for five terms and was elected member of Assembly in 1867, though the district was regarded as safely Republican. He was the candidate of his party for Congress in one or two campaigns. He affiliated with his party during the Civil war, yet believed in the suppression of the Rebellion and the unity of the nation. He contributed liberally for the payment of bounties, and, to induce enlistments, at one time paid $1000, at another pledged $100 to be divided equally among the next four who should enlist, and again personally advanced $3,000 to enable the town to fill its quota, trusting to future legislation for its re-payment. Western New York has been largely Republican since the inception of that party, so Mr. BUTTON's political preferment was confined to the offices stated, but in the councils of his party and among those in this end of the State who were instrumental in party organization he was a prominent factor.

Judge TEN BROECK appointed him sole executor of his will with plenary power in the management and disposition of his large estate. When it is remembered that his property included about 7,000 acres of land the magnitude of the undertaking can be partly appreciated. This vast area he managed with consummate judgment, making sales from year to year until the entire land was converted into money or securities that were gilt-edged. He was also by the act of incorporation one of the trustees of TEN BROECK Free Academy, and by virtue of his residence in Franklinville and his aggressive individuality was the master spirit of the Board of Trustees until his resignation shortly prior to his death. The academy was erected in the village, which was then remote from a railroad and where education was at a low ebb. Mr. BUTTON assumed the direction of this business with his wonted energy and the academy was soon the potent agency in eastern Cattaraugus for higher education. His zeal in behalf of this institution was irrepressible and he seized every opportunity to advance its influence. When Franklinville became a full-fledged village Mr. BUTTON, though opposed to incorporation, was elected as one of its first trustees, as the taxpayers had implicit faith in his judgment and fairness. He well served his constituents in this capacity, believing thoroughly in public improvements and yet guarding wisely the expenditure of the moneys raised.

In 1879 he united with the First United Presbyterian Church Society of Franklinville, of which his wife was a member. Thenceforth he was a faithful, earnest Christian. He made no parade of his new life. He contributed one-fourth of the $11,000 used in building the substantial church edifice of this society. He died in Franklinville, Sept. 8, 1884, leaving his widow, four sons, and two daughters, all of whom are still living.

Mr. BUTTON was a man of sterling, positive traits of character. He despised any cant or hypocrisy and asserted his intense convictions confidently and fearlessly. On any matter, either local or of a wider range, he took a decided stand. With little education in his youth, yet, by friction with men, by keen observation, by an aptitude for comprehending the pith of any subject, and by his unfailing common sense, he soon became well informed. He made a marked impression on the people of eastern Cattaraugus, was thoroughly respected, and was recognized as one of its leading men. In defining to a young man the cardinal principles leading to success he stated they were "integrity, industry, and perseverance," and they certainly comprised the elements that made his own career so successful.

Ed. Note: This biography includes a photograph of Jonas K. BUTTON

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 649

Surnames: BUTTON, BROWN, LITTLE, CURTIS

Reuben C. BUTTON, son of Lyman and Polly (BROWN) BUTTON, was born in Machias, Nov. 25, 1839, and removed to this town in 1855, living for a time with his uncle, Jonas K. BUTTON. Nov. 3, 1861, he married Elizabeth, daughter of John LITTLE, and was engaged in farming until 1865, when he opened a livery stable in the village. In 1876 his wife died and Nov. 25, 1880 he married, second, Addie V., daughter of Sylvester and Mary CURTIS.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 649

Surname: BUTTON

Peter T. B. BUTTON has always taken an active interest in the mercantile and political affairs of the town. He has served as supervisor and in other offices, and was largely instrumental in organizing the Franklinville Agricultural and Driving Park Association, of which he has served as treasurer, secretary, and president.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 649

Surnames: CAMPBELL, MORGAN, DICKINSON

Robert CAMPBELL, a relative of Judge CAMPBELL, of Cherry Valley, Otsego county, N. Y., was born in that place and resided there until after his majority. He married Elizabeth CAMPBELL, and in 1829 he came with his family to Franklinville and settled on a part of lot 29 on the road known as Otsego street, from the fact that every settler thereon was from Otsego county. He remained on the place about thirty years and then, with his son, Andrew J. CAMPBELL, removed to Black Creek and remained there until his death. Children: Samuel, Mary Ann, Albert J., Eleanor, Alanson, Deborah, and Andrew J. Samuel married Eliza MORGAN, July 24, 1851, and remained on lot 29 until his death in 1889. Children: Dewitt, Sarah, and Amenzo. Amenzo now resides on the place with his mother. Albert J. married Permelia daughter of John W. DICKINSON, Feb. 2, 1841, and settled on a farm in upper Sugartown, where he resided until his health failed, when he moved to Franklinville village and kept a hotel twenty-five years. Children: Mary and Devillo. Devillo went to Mazo Manie, Wis., where he is a druggist. Mary, at the age of twenty-four, met with an accident in a collision on the Great Western railroad at Komoka, Ontario, which rendered her a cripple.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 649

Surnames: CARPENTER, DE KAY, SCOTT

Warren CARPENTER, son of Zenas (see Farmersville), was born Jan. 17, 1827, and Dec. 18, 1849, married Catherine J., daughter of Thomas DE KAY, of New Hudson, Allegany county; children: Zenas, Thomas, Elroy V., Samuel, and Julia A. (Mrs. E. D. SCOTT), who died Nov. 7, 1890. Mr. CARPENTER lived with his parents until their deaths and in Lyndon until 1880, when he came to Franklinville village. He has taken an active interest in laying out and beautifying Mt. Prospect Cemetery. Besides this he has been called upon to plan and adorn several other burial places.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 649

Surnames: CARR, CHAMBERLAIN, POWER, HOGG, WEED, JOLLY

Peter CARR, a postmaster under the British government, came to Franklinville in 1849 and purchased the farm belonging to Moses CHAMBERLIN, which he made his permanent home until his death in 1873. He was justice of the peace several years. He left Peter CARR, Jr., his only heir, in possession of his estate, who still resides upon it. In 1857 Peter, jr., married Katharine, daughter of Patrick POWER. Children: Mary, Rose (Mrs. Wilson HOGG), Josephine (Mrs. Charles WEED), Katie, Anna (Mrs. J. G. JOLLY), and Joseph.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 649 & 650

Surnames: CASE, MELROSE, MORGAN

Thomas CASE, born in Berkshire, Tioga county, Jan. 14, 1818 came in Feb., 1838 with his father, Phineas CASE, from Candor, N. Y., to Lyndon, where he resided until March, 1884, when he moved to Franklinville. On Jan. 14, 1845, he married Betsey, daughter of Nicholas MELROSE, of Lyndon. She was born Sept. 20, 1826 in Delhi, Delaware county. Children, all born in Lyndon: Jason Daniel, Oct. 3, 1847; Edward Nelson, Dec. 9, 1849; Charles Arbuckle, Oct. 25, 1851; and Eben Leicester, Aug. 19, 1859. Edward N. is a successful farmer; the other three are bankers. In Sept., 1865, Thomas CASE assisted in organizing the Cuba Banking Company, of Cuba, N. Y., and later in changing the company to the succeeding organization, now the First National Bank of Cuba. In Oct., 1870, he assisted in starting the Bank of Olean, which in 1871 was re-organized into the First National Bank. In Aug., 1878, he assisted in organizing the Bank of Ellicottville, of which his son, C. A. CASE, has been the cashier. In Nov., 1883, with others, he started the Citizens' Bank of Arcade, N. Y., of which he is now a director, his son, J. D. CASE, being the president. In Dec., 1872, Mr. CASE proposed and with others organized the Bank of Franklinville, which was subsequently merged into the First National Bank of Franklinville, and has always been an active director and for several years its efficient president. His son, J. D. CASE, is the cashier. Mr. CASE has been a fortunate financier, honest and punctual in his business affairs, cheerful, social, and temperate. With a free hand and open purse he aids everything beneficial to society.

Jason D. CASE, son of Thomas, was born in Lyndon, Oct. 3, 1847, attended school in the Hayden district and two terms at the Rushford Academy, and assisted in the farm duties at home and his father in buying eggs, butter, etc. In the fall of 1868 he taught the Morgan district school near Cuba reservoir, and the following summer he was engaged as superintendent of the Cherry Run and Pithole Oil Company, making a satisfactory sale of their property in 1872, when he bought a third-interest in some valuable oil property near Parker's Landing, Pa. Mr. CASE was active in the organization of the first bank in Franklinville and later of its successor, the First National; of the Bank of Ellicottville, of which he is a director; of the Citizens' Bank of Arcade, of which he was the first president; of the canning company in Franklinville being for some time a member of its executive committee; and of the Franklinville Cemetery Association, of which he has been trustee and treasurer since its foundation. Jan. 29, 1873 Mr. CASE married Helen C., daughter of Samuel and Catharine MORGAN, of Cuba. Children: Nellie and Gertrude A.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 650

Surnames: CHAMBERLIN, CARR, PLATT, CURTIS, KNOX, BABBITT

Moses CHAMBERLIN came from Dutchess county to Ellicottville in 1816 and thence he moved to Franklinville, settling on the farm now owned by Peter CARR, where he lived about thirty years. He then moved to Allegany, where he died in 1869. Mr. CHAMBERLIN married Anna PLATT, of Caledonia, N. Y. Children: Mary (Mrs. Sylvester CURTIS), Dr. William, Dr. Harry, Ann E. (Mrs. John KNOX), Laura, Charles (died in 1880), Eliza (died in 1887), Henry (died in 1865), Lucy (Mrs. E. N. BABBITT) died in 1884, and George S. (died in 1884).

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 650

Surnames: CLEMENTS, LOCHARD

James CLEMENTS came here from Ireland in 1859. In March, 1859, he married Margaret LOCHARD. He purchased and moved onto the farm he still occupies. Children living: James, Mary, Thomas, Margaret, John, William, Timothy, George, Robert, Alexander, and Samuel. James and John are partners in a grocery in Franklinville. John has been town clerk several terms.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 650 & 651

Surnames: COLLIE, MITCHELL, WATSON

James COLLIE, a native of Morayshire, Scotland, and a son of James and Barbara (MITCHELL) COLLIE, was born March 10, 1821, and at the age of twenty-six married Elizabeth WATSON. In 1853 he came with his wife to America and settled in Franklinville, moving to his present farm in 1857. Of his eleven children eight are living: Peter, William, James, Jessie, Mary, Elizabeth, Mima, and Louisa.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 651

Surnames: COLVIN, WHITCOMB

Milton N. COLVIN was born March 28, 1870 on Chappel hill in Humphrey. He was the son of Royal and Mary COLVIN and the second child of a family of seven children: Charles, Milton N., Carrie, Lucia, Agnes, Hattie, and Welcome. Sickness and other dire misfortunes pursued the family until it was broken up and its members scattered. Milton was adopted into the family of Walter WHITCOMB, of Humphrey, and came to this town with Mr. WHITCOMB in 1883, with whom he resided until 1891 when he began life in earnest.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 651

Surnames: CONRAD, KORTWRIGHT, WARNER, SILL, FARWELL, MORRIS, SEARL, GARDNER

Henry CONRAD, from Tompkins county, during the summer of 1807 located on the north half of lot 37 and commenced the erection of a mill, which he completed in the summer of 1808. The mill was in keeping with its surroundings, primitive indeed, but it would grind wheat into flour which did not always resemble the "beautiful snow". That useful old mill more properly belonged to the "Tuscan Order" of architecture than to any other. In the early part of 1807 John, Nicholas, and Daniel KORTWRIGHT, from Tompkins county, settled upon the north part of lot 36 and south part of lot 37. They were millwrights and superintended the building of Henry CONRAD's grist-mill, and instructed "Uncle Hank" (as he was commonly called) in the art of grinding grain and taking toll. Owing to some defect in its construction the mill was not uniform in its mechanical behavior. There is one anecdote in relation to Uncle Hank and his mill which illustrates the fun-loving propensities, of the WARNER family. Parley WARNER, who lived near the mill, on observing some customer emerge from the forest with a bag of grain across his brawny shoulders, would stealthily approach the rear of the mill and seize the arms of the wheel in his herculean grip, and, with muscles firmly set, await the coming ordeal. The gate would be raised, but the wheel would not move; it was as firmly bound as the nymphs had bound Andromeda. After uttering a few words not admissible in Sunday school Uncle Hank, armed with the necessary tools, would go around to the rear of the mill to see "vat vas der ail mit der tam veel." By the time he reached the wheel Parley would be snugly concealed in the alders. Mr. CONRAD was a kind-hearted man. He had four children by his first wife: Elizabeth, Margaret, Catharine, and Samuel. Margaret married Elijah SILL; Elizabeth married Thaddeus FARWELL; Catharine and Samuel were mutes and were never married. One of the granddaughters of Mr. CONRAD, Fanny FARWELL, is the wife of D. J. MORRIS. By his second marriage Mr. CONRAD had six children: Peter, Henry, Joseph, John, Henrietta, and Fanny. About 1820 he sent Samuel and Catharine to New York, where they received an education. When they came back they could read and write fluently and converse by means of the hand alphabet. Samuel died of smallpox at his brother-in-law's, Elijah SILL, about 1830. Lyman SEARL, Thomas M. SILL, Fayette SEARL, and Robert E. GARDNER also married granddaughters of Henry CONRAD.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 651 & 652

Surnames: CROSBY, AUSTIN, STARR, KENYON, WENRICK, WRIGHT, BAILLET, WARNER, McCLUER, WHEELER

Samuel A., Alanson, Jedediah W., and Lot C. CROSBY came to Franklinville in 1830 and settled on CROSBY hill, the place taking its name from the four brothers. Alanson and Jedediah purchased portions of lot 28, while S. A. (known here as Austin CROSBY) made his home on lot 36 and Lot C, on lot 35. They were sons of Col. Jedediah CROSBY, who was born near Boston, Mass., in 1776. At an early period he removed to Gorham, N. Y., where he married Mabel AUSTIN, a native of Connecticut. She was born May 1, 1782. In 1805 the couple moved to Bergen, N. Y., then known as the Triangle, where they made a permanent home. Colonel CROSBY was a volunteer in the War of 1812 and commanded a regiment at the battle of Fort Erie, where one-third of his soldiers were left on the field. Both Colonel CROSBY and his wife were of English descent. He died in Bergen, August 18, 1830; she died May 21, 1866. They had five sons and four daughters, the latter being Polly, Louanny, Harriet, and Lovina. S. Austin CROSBY married and had sons Christopher C., Jedediah W., and Luther V. Christopher C. married Helen STARR. Jedediah married Viola KENYON and resided on the homestead until his death. Luther married Mary WENRICK. Newton A. and Ora B. are deceased. Alanson CROSBY married Cornelia WRIGHT; children: Mabel, Manley, and Alanson, Jr. Mabel married George BAILLET. Manley (see Bench and Bar, page 363) is a practicing attorney in Corry, Pa. Alanson enlisted in 1862 in the 154th N. Y. Vol. Inf. and was killed before Atlanta, Ga. He was a young man of rare promise. As a well-deserved tribute to his memory the Grand Army Post in Franklinville received his name. Jedediah CROSBY, Jr., married a daughter of Roswell WARNER, a granddaughter of Gen. Joseph McCLUER. He still resides on CROSBY hill, occupying the place on which he settled when he first came to this town. One of his daughters married Dudley KENYON and a second married Thomas WHEELER.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 652

Surnames: CUMMINGS, GRAVES

Solomon CUMMINGS came to Farmersville in 1829 and a few years later married Jonathan GRAVES's eldest daughter, Mariette. He became a merchant, was successful, represented Farmersville as supervisor in 1843, 1844, 1846, and 1848 and Franklinville in 1875, was a very exact business man, and always performed his duties with ability and fidelity. For many years he has resided in Franklinville. He sold his property in 1850 to his father and brother, John T. CUMMINGS, who continued the mercantile business until his sudden death in 1876. J. T. CUMMINGS left all excellent record behind him for ability and integrity. He was supervisor of Farmersville in 1863. By consulting him and his library almost any matter of history, law, politics, religion, or science could be learned. From tinkering clocks to making or repairing any article of the house or tool on the farm he was an expert, and he had a great variety of tools that he persistently refused to lend. He was a Congregationalist, a cultivated scholar, and a valuable friend. The CUMMINGS’s emigrated to this town from Warren, Mass., and are direct descendants of the Puritans.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 652

Surnames: CURTIS, ROSE, FOOT, FOSTER, CHAMBERLIN, BUTTON

Solomon CURTIS, from Lanesboro, Mass., located on a large tract of land where the village of Franklinville now stands in 1806 and removed thither with the first settlers, erecting his log house a few rods west of the center stake in the village plat in 1808. It is said that hunting and trapping were his primary and agriculture his secondary pursuits. Mr. CURTIS married Abigail ROSE, of Rushford, Allegany county; children: Azur, Rensselaer, Polly, and Sylvester. He died in 1840 and his wife in 1837. Rensselaer CURTIS was born in Franklinville, Feb. 8, 1818, and Feb. 8, 1848, married Ruth M., daughter of Ezekiel and Polly (FOOT) FOSTER. Locating in Machias in 1850 he returned to Franklinville nine years later, and in 1863 settled on the farm he now occupies. His son Henry R. is an attorney in the village. Sylvester CURTIS, born April 1, 1819 married, in 1844, Mary, daughter of Moses and Anna CHAMBERLIN, and for eighteen years lived on the farm where his father died; he then sold out and moved to his present farm. His daughter is the wife of Reuben BUTTON.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 652 & 653

Surnames: DAVIS, KLOCK

Thomas DAVIS, son of John and a native of Wales, England, came to America with his father when ten years old and settled in Litchfield, Herkimer county. In 1857 Mr. DAVIS married Sarah M., daughter of Jacob KLOCK, and in 1865 located in Lyndon, of which town he was supervisor in 1873 and 1874. In 1882 he came to this town and settled as a farmer at Cadiz, being elected supervisor of Franklinville in 1891 and 1892. Mr. DAVIS in public and private is an exemplary citizen, serving his constituents with honor and credit, and in all matters of importance to the town and county he takes a deep interest.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 653

Surnames: DEAN, YOUNG, LITTLE, SPRING, CONNERS

Danforth W. DEAN, son of Tower J. and Esther E. (YOUNG) DEAN, was born in Centerville, Allegany county, Feb. 8, 1853. In 1877 he removed to Franklinville, where he has since followed the carpenter's trade, engaging in 1878 with Richard LITTLE in the contracting and building business; he is also at the head of the DEAN & SPRING Manufacturing Company. He was supervisor of Franklinville in 1890 and served in that position with honor and credit. Feb. 8, 1882, Mr. DEAN married Jennie, daughter of John CONNERS.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 653

Surnames: DREWRY, SIMONDS

Willard DREWRY removed from Genesee county to this town in 1831 and settled with his wife on a wild lot on Genesee street. In 1865 he sold to Mr. SIMONDS and went west. His son Ebenezer enlisted in 1861 for three years, and served his full time; he was mustered into the service in the 105th Regt. in Oct., 1861, and was honorably discharged. He died in 1878.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 653

Surname: DUNCAN

James DUNCAN and his wife Annie came from Scotland in 1833 and the next year settled in Franklinville, first at what is now the village and subsequently on East hill. He finally removed to the village and died. They had nine children.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 653

Surnames: ELMER, CROSBY, DICKINSON

William ELMER was born in Hartford, Conn., May 14, 1807, and came with his father to Genesee county in 1815. He married Harriet CROSBY, March 27, 1835, and they had four daughters and two sons. He moved to Franklinville, March 16, 1855, and his wife died June 4, 1860. He married his second wife, Mrs. Lydia DICKINSON, Nov. 27, 1862. Austin W. ELMER, the eldest son, was mustered into the navy in Sept., 1864, for one year, and died of disease contracted in the service. Crosby L. ELMER resides on the homestead, with his father, on CROSBY hill. The family influence has been exemplary.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 653

Surnames: ELY, WALKER, DAY, SMITH, FERRIS, STILLWELL

William ELY, son of C. C. ELY, of Rushford, Allegany county, was born July 27, 1841, and obtained his education in the common schools and in Rushford Academy. In 1862 he enlisted in Co. D, 64th N. Y. Vols., and was in all the engagements with his regiment from Antietam to Cold Harbor, where he was wounded by a minie-ball in the ankle. Being discharged in 1865 he returned home and in 1866 came to Franklinville, where he started a drug store in the village under the firm name of WALKER & ELY, which two years later was changed to ELY & DAY by WALKER disposing of his interest to W. A. DAY. DAY subsequently sold out to H. D. SMITH and the firm became ELY & SMITH. In 1884 SMITH sold to W. H. FERRIS and the style was changed to ELY & FERRIS. In 1867 Mr. ELY married Caroline S., daughter of Marcus and Susan (STILLWELL) SMITH. Mr. ELY was supervisor of Franklinville in 1886 and 1887.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 653

Surnames: ESSEX, MORSE, RATHBUN

Moses ESSEX came from Decatur, N. Y., in 1827, and settled on the west part of lot 13, which he had previously purchased from James O. MORSE and Benjamin RATHBUN. He soon erected an ashery, which he operated over twenty years. He purchased all the ashes and black-salts that he could from those who were clearing up their farms and worked them into potash, which he shipped to New York city. In those early times about the only way the settlers had to raise money to pay taxes and buy bread was by making ashes and black-salts, which were jocosely called "legal tender." ESSEX remained on the place about 23 years. His daughter resides on a part of the farm.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 653 & 654

Surnames: FARRAR, LOOMIS, CARVER

Aleanzor M. FARRAR is a son of Wiggin M. and Betsey (LOOMIS) FARRAR, of Machias (q. v.). He was born in that town Sept. 15, 1829, and Jan. 1, 1854, married Lydia CARVER. Until 1884 Mr. FARRAR was a resident of Machias, on the old homestead where he served as justice of the peace twelve years and as assessor. In 1884 he came to Franklinville. He has in his possession a sword used by John FARRAR, his grandfather, on the field of Bunker Hill.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 654

Surnames: FARRINGTON, McAFEE

Edward H. FARRINGTON, son of Harvey, was born in Newport, N. Y., Dec. 1, 1848. His father was an early cheese maker, in which business the son was educated. In 1873 Edward H. came to Franklinville and began manufacturing cheese, being interested in 1890 in nine factories producing several hundred thousand pounds of cheese annually. In 1872 Mr. FARRINGTON married Sarah, daughter of Nathaniel McAFEE, of Canada. Children: Irvin A., Howard P., Harry, and Ellen.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 654

Surnames: FARWELL, COOK

Henry C. FARWELL, son of Thaddeus (see Ischua), was born Feb. 19, 1832. In 1854 he engaged in lumbering in the great lumber woods of Wisconsin, and June 1, 1861, enlisted in Co. K, 4th Wis. Vols., fighting in the battles of Williamsburg, Second Bull Run, Seven Days' Fight, Antietam, South Mountain, Fredericksburg (both engagements), Gettysburg, and Rappahannock Station, where he was wounded by a ball passing through the leg. He was promoted captain of his company and was discharged Oct. 14, 1864. Returning to Ischua he married, March 28, 1866, Anna, daughter of Henry and Betsey COOK, of Mansfield. He was a farmer in Ischua, which town he served as supervisor in 1873 and again in 1875 and as assessor several years. Mr. FARWELL moved to the village of Franklinville in 1885. Children: Lettie C. and Arthur M.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 654

Surnames: FAY, RICE, COLE, PIERCE, GREENE, LITCHFIELD

James FAY, son of Cyrus, was born in Sturbridge, Mass., married Olive RICE, of Brookfield, Mass., and came to Cattaraugus county in 1829, in 1830 settling on the farm now owned by Cyrus M. FAY, his son. He was a man highly respected, held several town offices, and was a member and deacon of the Presbyterian church. He died in 1882, aged ninety-two years. Of his five children four are living: William G., Sarah J. (Mrs. I. L. COLE), J. C., and Cyrus M. Cyrus M. FAY, living on the homestead, was born Nov. 13, 1833. In 1858 he married Ellen I., daughter of William M. PIERCE, of this town. Children: Sarah O. (Mrs. B. J. GREENE) and Elsie M. (Mrs. E. E. LITCHFIELD). He was supervisor from 1877 to 1879 and assessor nine years. 

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 654

Surnames: GOO, BRAND

J. B. GOO, son of Hiram, was born in Ashford, Sept. 29, 1829, and in Jan., 1855, married Lucy J., daughter of Samuel BRAND, of Ellicottville. By trade he was a carpenter. About 1860 he moved to Yorkshire Center, where he, carried on cheese-box manufacturing. In 1882 he came to Cadiz. He has two sons and three daughters.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 654

Surnames: GREEN, JENNINGS, HOLDEN, RUST

Allen M. GREEN, born in Cazenovia, N. Y., Aug. 9, 1812, came with his father, Allen GREEN, to Cattaraugus county in 1826. In 1838 he married Mary JENNINGS, of Fort Madison, Iowa, where he lived and followed his trade of blacksmith. Upon the death of his wife in 1840 Mr. GREEN returned to Cattaraugus county, and in 1845 he married Julia J., daughter of Arnold HOLDEN, of Ashford. He settled in Franklinville in 1869. Of his six children three are living: Emma (Mrs. Eugene RUST), Burnett J., and Perry W.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 654 & 655

Surnames: GRIERSON, McQUENN, St. JOHN, FULLER, SKEELS

James GRIERSON, son of Thomas and Agnes (McQUENN), was born in Dumfries, Scotland, May 27, 1832, and came to Franklinville in 1854, where he resided for one year, when he went to Otto, where he worked at his trade, as miller for Selleck St. JOHN. There he married Melissa, daughter of Sylvester and Harriet (FULLER) SKEELS. He also lived in East Otto and in Ellicottville. In 1870 he returned to Franklinville and purchased the grist-mill below Cadiz known as the Conrad mill, which he conducted until 1876, when he moved to the village of Franklinville, where he now resides. Children: Luna C., Mina C, Harriet A. (deceased), Nettie O., Grace M., and Edgar J.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 655

Surnames: HACKETT, WOODS, SEARLE, SILL

George S. HACKETT, son of Stephen K. (see Ischua), was born Feb. 20, 1844, in the town of Ischua, and at the age of seven years, his mother dying, he was bound out to D. H. WOODS of Rushford, Allegany county, where he lived until Dec. 22, 1863, when he enlisted in Co. B, 2d N. Y. Mounted Rifles. He was actively engaged in the battles of Shady Grove, North Anna River, Tolopotomoy Creek, Cold Harbor, Gaines's Farm, siege of Petersburg, and Pegram Farm, and was discharged at White Hall Run on June 18, 1865. Returning to Rushford Mr. HACKETT married, July 4, 1866, Fannie M., daughter of John W. and Caroline (SEARLE) SILL, and in 1867 settled on Buzzard hill in Humphrey. He followed cheese making for a number of years, residing in various places, and in 1881 located in Franklinville village, where on Jan. 10, 1891 his wife died. She was born April 1, 1846, and bore him two children, Willie B. (deceased) and Lewis A.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 655

Surname: HAYDEN

Squire C. HAYDEN has been prominent in the industrial and political interests of the town and county, and in various capacities has represented his constituents with eminent ability and unswerving integrity. He is trustee of the village and was supervisor of Farmersville in 1879 and Franklinville in 1889.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 655

Surnames: HAYNES, STEWART, BUSECKER, SMITH, MORRIS, GRIERSON, WILLARD

James A. HAYNES, a native of Yorkshire and a son of Daniel B. and Amanda (STEWART) HAYNES, was born March 7, 1839, and Feb. 24, 1861, married Isadore BUSECKER, of Ischua, who died Jan. 20, 1868. May 19, 1869, Mr. HAYNES married for his second wife Mary A., daughter of S. J. SMITH, of Ischua. The same year he formed a partnership with Mr. SMITH in the mercantile trade under the firm name of S. J. SMITH & Co., which business was continued until 1873, when Mr. HAYNES sold his interest to A. J. MORRIS. He then purchased a farm, which he sold in 1885, and in 1886 moved to Franklinville village, where he handled sewing machines until 1890, when he started with Thomas GRIERSON a flour and feed store. Soon afterward Mr. GRIERSON sold to F. P. WILLARD. Mr. HAYNES was supervisor of Ischua in 1872.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 655

Surnames: HOLDEN, RUSH

John R. HOLDEN was born July 30, 1843, in Ashford, and is a son of Arnold and Patience HOLDEN. In Sept., 1861, he enlisted in Co. B, 9th N. Y. Cav., and was discharged from the Patent Office Hospital in April, 1862 for sickness. He re-enlisted in October, 1864, in Co. A, 9th N. Y. Cav., and was mustered out in June, 1865. Jan. 18, 1863, he married Melvina, daughter of Poltus and Elizabeth RUSH, of East Otto, and in 1867 settled in Farmersville, whence he removed in 1885 to the village of Franklinville, where he has been engaged largely in the cheese trade, a business he has successfully followed for more than a quarter of a century. Mr. HOLDEN has been prominent in town affairs and is vice-president of the First National Bank of Franklinville. His father, Arnold HOLDEN, was supervisor of Ashford in 1831.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 655

Surnames: HOLLISTER, NORTON

Samuel L. HOLLISTER was born in Cairo, Greene county, Oct. 29, 1788. In 1806 he came to this town and in 1812 married Sibyl NORTON, who was born in Litchfield county, Conn., May 24,1791, and moved to Franklinville in 1811. In 1816 he removed to Great Valley and in March, 1821, went to Mansfield, where he died June 29, 1849.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 655

Surnames: HOLMES, BUTLER

Hosea T. HOLMES, son of Peter HOLMES, an early settler in Farmersville, was born in that town Dec. 28, 1821. In Jan., 1843, he married Eliza A., daughter of Harvey BUTLER, and until 1871 was a farmer. He then came to Franklinville and died June 13, 1889. Children: A. O., Clark L., and L. M. 

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 656

Surnames: HOLMES, SPRAGUE, STONE

Joseph HOLMES, a native of Leeds, England, came to America and to Franklinville in 1830, settling in Cadiz, where he followed his trade of gunsmith and kept also a dry goods and grocery store. He was born March 6, 1817, and died June 9, 1882. He married Amantha, daughter of Eli A. and Finetta SPRAGUE, of Ischua, and had born to him seven children, five of whom are living: John T., Alfie F., Jennie G., Mary E. (Mrs. R. STONE), Reuben B.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 656

Surnames: HOTCHKISS, SEARL, OSGOOD, PLATT

Benjamin HOTCHKISS, about 1817, came from Whitehall, N. Y., and after a brief residence in the Ischua valley located on lot 38. His son Hiram settled on the same lot a little farther west. One of his daughters was the wife of Isaac SEARL and another became Mrs. Aaron OSGOOD. Hiram HOTCHKISS was a soldier in the War of 1812. Simeon HOTCHKISS located on lot 38. He married Lucretia, daughter of Stephen PLATT, from Plattsburgh, N. Y. Children: Benjamin, Sarah, Alexander, Mary, Stephen, Orange, and Charles. Stephen and Orange enlisted in the 154th Regiment in Aug., 1862, and both died in the service. Alexander served in the artillery.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 656

Surnames: INGALLS, STORRS

Simeon INGALLS came from Otsego, N. Y., in 1828, with his wife and family, and settled on lot 29. He married Martha, daughter of T. D. STORRS. He finally sold his place and moved to Tennessee, where he was at the breaking out of the Rebellion. With several others from the north he was forced to leave the State, barely escaping with their lives.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 656

Surnames: JOHNSTON, SILL, PENMAN

John JOHNSTON was a Scotchman by birth. He came to this county in 1833 and bought a farm of Elijah SILL; in June, 1834, his family joined him, and in September following he died. He had four sons and three daughters; two sons, James and John, reside on the homestead. John JOHNSTON, Jr., born in May, 1818 married Agnes PENMAN, by whom he had seven children. He was a popular citizen and a respected gentleman; he represented the town of Franklinville on the Board of Supervisors in 1859.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 656

Surnames: KINGSBURY, BASSETT, SMITH

William W. KINGSBURY, son of Benjamin, was born in Cherry Valley, Otsego county. In 1830 or 1831 his father came to Rushford, Allegany county, where he now resides. He is a carpenter and farmer. He married Betsey BASSETT and has three children. Frank D. KINGSBURY, his son, was born Sept. 25, 1849, and in 1880 married Arlouine L. SMITH, of Rushford. In 1882 he came to this town and purchased the Dell Zell farm; children: Harry and Willie.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 656

Surnames: KINGSLEY, GILBERT, McNALL

Warren KINGSLEY, son of Nathan, came from Otsego county to Franklinville in 1825, he being at that time seventeen years of age. For five years he worked on the farm and for eight years was a clerk in the employ of Tilly GILBERT in Cadiz. February 22, 1838, he married Augusta, daughter of John McNALL, who died Dec. 26, 1889. Mr. KINGSLEY was thoroughly identified with the best interests of the town, holding for twelve years the office of assessor and for a number of terms the position of town clerk. With the exception of some fifteen years, which were spent in Machias, Mr. KINGSLEY made the town of Franklinville his home from the date of his settlement until his death, which occurred at the residence of his son, Avery W. KINGSLEY, Feb. 25, 1891.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 656

Surnames: LAIDLAW, DUNCAN

Gilbert LAIDLAW and his wife Margaret and their three sons and two daughters emigrated to America from Scotland in 1851. They first settled in Rochester and in 1852 removed to this town, locating on a farm in what has since been known as the LAIDLAW district. His wife died soon after their arrival and his death occurred in 1863. One son, Hon. William G., is a prominent lawyer in Ellicottville; the other children were Robert, James, Agnes, and Betsey (Mrs. A. DUNCAN).

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 656 & 657

Surnames: LATHAM, CHILTON, WALWORTH, WINSLOW, CROSBY, NELSON, PARKHURST

The LATHAM family trace their ancestry back to Mary CHILTON, the first female to land on Plymouth Rock from the Mayflower. The American Messenger for 1850 says: "Chancellor WALWORTH, an eminent jurist of this State, traces his ancestry to Mary CHILTON. John WINSLOW, brother of Edward WINSLOW, one of the first governors of the Plymouth colony, married her, and their daughter became the wife of Robert LATHAM, from England, who came to this country some twenty years after the arrival of the Mayflower. From Robert LATHAM and his wife all the LATHAM’s in this country, so far as known, have descended." A branch of the family early moved to Vermont and at about the same time David LATHAM settled at Lyme, Conn. His grandson, Joseph LATHAM, born Dec. 12, 1787, came thence to Le Roy, Genesee county, in 1808, commencing the journey on his birthday, crossing the Hudson river on the ice opposite the city of Albany and the Genesee river where the city of Rochester now stands. He volunteered in the War of 1812 with the rank of sergeant-major and participated in the storming of Fort Erie with unloaded muskets and fixed bayonets. May 2, 1818, he married Polly, daughter of Col. Jedediah CROSBY, came to Franklinville in the spring of 1834, settled on CROSBY hill on the farm now owned by his son, Joseph LATHAM, and died June 7, 1865; his wife died Dec. 9, 1870. Children: Joseph, William, Russel, and Helen. Russel LATHAM enlisted in the Rebellion, served on board the U. S. gunboat Towa, and after that vessel was destroyed in action with the rebel forts on Cumberland river he died at Clarksville, Tenn., Dec. 23, 1864.

Joseph LATHAM, Jr., born Dec. 12, 1819 has been a minister in the Genesee Conference of the Methodist Episcopal church for over forty years. He married, Sept. 4, 1851, Lydia R., daughter of Hon. Lyman NELSON, county judge of Potter county, Pa.; children: Franklin (died Nov. 4, 1874), Orry N., William H., Russel M. (died August 28, 1867), Lyman R., Joseph C., Minnie M., and Josephine Eugenie (died Jan. 22,1878). Orry N. is a physician at Bolivar, N. Y.; William H. is a lawyer in Nebraska and county judge of Frontier county; Minnie M. married Rev. F. S. PARKHURST, of the Genesee Conference, Aug. 25,1880. The LATHAM family has represented California as collector of the port of San Francisco, as governor, and as U. S. senator.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 657 & 658

Surnames: LOW, BUCHANAN, PUDDY

Teneyck LOW was born in Cherry Valley, N. Y., Aug. 13, 1789. He was a soldier in the War of 1812 and served in the militia under Gen. Stephen Van Rensselaer; he was one of the brave little band who volunteered to cross the Niagara and attack the British at Queenstown Heights, where he received a slight wound in the shoulder. Some years after the war he married Abigail BUCHANAN and came to Franklinville in 1825, settling on lot 21, where he resided until his death May 15, 1870. Children: Charlotte, Margaret, Anna, Amanda, Marvin, Judson, Mary, and Clarinda. Marvin married, Feb. 8, 1851, Lucy PUDDY, and resided on the homestead until his death Aug. 25, 1886. Children: Alvin A., Lluwellyn, and Judson M. Alvin now lives on the place with his widowed mother. Judson was born Jan. 22, 1839, and remained on the farm with his father until 1861, when he enlisted in Co. B, 9th N. Y. Cav., as orderly-sergeant. He went to the front and for gallantry in the service was soon promoted to second lieutenant. His indomitable courage and readiness to undertake dangerous duties often led him into hand-to-hand encounters with the enemy. On one occasion he and his company were sent forward to ascertain the position of the rebels. Their course led them into a piece of woods where they found a considerable force of cavalry drawn up ready to receive them. The rebels were so vastly superior in numbers that instant retreat was their only course, during which he became slightly detached from his company and was at once surrounded by five Confederates, the foremost of whom exclaimed "Now, you d…d Yank, surrender!" After shooting one rebel through the head and unhorsing two with his saber a fourth rode up behind and struck him across the neck with a carbine, which knocked Judson from his horse, and while he laid on the ground a horse struck him in the side, from the effects of which he died Nov 9, 1863.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 658

Surnames: LOWDEN, WALLACE, DICKSON, WOOLLEY, TEN BROECK

Robert LOWDEN was born in Glasgow, Scotland, and fitted himself for the ministry at a college in Edinburgh. His father, a sea captain having a daughter and five sons, emigrated to America and settled in Pictou, Nova Scotia, where the family became largely interested in mercantile business and ship building, in which Robert continued, and thus relinquished the idea of entering the ministry. He married a widow, Mrs. WALLACE, nee Abigail DICKSON, and had eight children. Charles Thomas, the third, was born in Merigomish, Nova Scotia, Aug. 22, 1815, and by his half-brother, Alexander WALLACE, was instructed in blacksmithing, a trade he followed for many years. At the age of twenty-one he came to the States and on Oct. 22, 1837, arrived at Yorkshire Center, where he set up as a blacksmith and continued for thirty-five years. In Nov., 1838, he married Pamey B. WOOLLEY, who died Nov. 4, 1877; in the fall of 1878 he married Mrs. Martha J., widow of John TEN BROECK, of Franklinville, to which village he at once removed. Mr. LOWDEN, after his settlement in Yorkshire, took an active interest in politics, and after becoming a legalized citizen he was chosen delegate to several Republican conventions, including the one at Ellicottville for organizing that party in Cattaraugus county. He was several times town clerk, justice of the peace, and justice of sessions; was supervisor of Yorkshire in 1861; was for five years loan commissioner; was postmaster at Yorkshire Center for twelve years; and from 1872 until Dec. 31, 1878, held the office of county superintendent of the poor. In all these positions he served with marked ability. He had six children; his two sons became blacksmiths.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 658

Surnames: LYON, PERKINS

Jonathan H. LYON came to this town in 1816 from Troy, N. Y. He married Harriet PERKINS, from Otsego county, in 1819. He was a man of some influence among the early settlers. About 1830 he was doing business in the dry goods line, tanning, shoemaking, etc. Children: Russell, Reuben, Delos, Amanda, and Clara. Clara is now living on the homestead lot in the village.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 658

Surnames: MASON, DUDLEY

Charles T. MASON was born in East Otto, April 30, 1840. His father was David T. MASON, a pioneer of that town. In 1858 Charles married Jennie E. daughter of John and Sally DUDLEY, and in 1864 he purchased the MASON homestead in East Otto. He followed carpentering and farming, and in 1881 removed to the village of Franklinville. Children: Charles H. of East Otto; Rosa M., who died March 4, 1889; and Lois A. Lewis J. MASON was supervisor of this town in 1856.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 658 to 660

Surnames: McLURE, McCLUER, McCLURE, GRICE, CARPENTER, NICHOLS, WIGHTMAN, LONG, WARNER, CROSBY, JEWELL, MATHEWSON, LEONARD, MORRIS

NOTE: The original orthography of this name in Franklinville was McLURE, though the pronunciation was identical with McCLUER or McCLURE. Gen. Joseph McCLUER used, it is said, the ancient form, but his descendants have many of them adopted the present spelling, McCLUER.

Gen. Joseph McCLUER (or McLURE), the first settler in the town of Franklinville, was born in Belchertown, Worcester county, Mass., May 14, 1775, and at about the age of twenty married Betsey GRICE. He came to this town and located on the site of the village in March, 1806, with his wife and five children. He was an agent and surveyor of the Holland Land Company. He served as captain on the Niagara frontier in the War of 1812 and was the soldier who rescued the bugler Burns after he had deserted from the British and swam the Niagara river to reach the American lines. Mr. McCLUER represented the counties of Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, and Niagara in the Assembly of 1814 – 15; the three counties forming one district. He was county clerk in 1821 and was a general in the State militia. After an active and eventful life he died of heart disease Sept. 11, 1833. His wife survived him eleven years, and was buried by his side in the family burying ground a few rods south of their former habitation. The remains of both were subsequently removed to the present cemetery. The family of Joseph and Betsey McCLUER consisted of five sons and three daughters: Samuel, Manly, Joseph, David, Freeman, Emily, Harriet, and Caroline. Samuel married Lucy CARPENTER and settled on the hill road on lot 30. He kept a hotel until his death. He was born Dec. 4, 1795, and died in July, 1829. He built the first frame barn between Franklinville and Ellicottville. He had nine children. Frederick, his son was born Aug. 5, 1825, married Permelia NICHOLS, and occupies the old homestead. Of their six children four are living: Dell, James H., Frank D., and John H. Manly married Emily WIGHTMAN and settled on the west part of lot 30. He filled several town offices, one of which was justice of the peace for several years. He was born June 26, 1800, and died May 1, 1853. Joseph occupied the west part of lot 23 prior to 1827, and resided on it until he removed to Canada in 1830. He was born June 1, 1802. He gave a bushel of wheat for four pounds of nails, which were used in building his barn. He married Patty LONG. Emily married Roswell WARNER, a farmer and a man of influence. One of their daughters married Jedediah CROSBY and settled on CROSBY hill. Harriet married Pardon T. JEWELL in 1825. Mr. JEWELL was one of the early teachers and took a lively interest in our common schools. He was superintendent of schools for several years. He was elected Justice of the peace in 1834 and again in 1840. Caroline married John G. MATHEWSON in 1826 and settled upon the north part of lot 4. After a few years Mr. MATHEWSON removed to Michigan with his family, where his wife died several years ago. Freeman McCLUER first located on the south part of the old homestead and afterward on the south part of lot 38. He was in the U. S. service from Nov., 1861, to about 1863, when he was discharged on account of ill health. Returning to Franklinville he was granted a pension, and soon disposed of his interests here and removed to Iowa. David always resided within a few rods of the old log cabin in which he was reared. He lived in the town about seventy-five years. He received a fair education, studied law, and became an attorney of some note. In 1817, at the age of ten, he drove a team once a week to Ellicottville to supply Baker LEONARD with provisions while he was building the first hotel erected in that place. He represented the town on the Board of Supervisors and filled other offices of trust. In Feb., 1825, he married the daughter of Thomas MORRIS. Of their children Leonard D. McCLUER enlisted in 1861 in the 21st N. Y. Regt., and served until 1865. John, the youngest son, enlisted in Co. I, 6th N. Y. Cav., and fell in battle in 1864.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 659 & 660

Surnames: McCLUER, BARBER, MALLORY, OLDER, BRIGGS, CAMPBELL, HOYT

Benjamin McCLUER, a brother of Gen. Joseph McCLUER, was born in Belchertown, Mass., in 1775. He married Elizabeth BARBER in 1814, came to this town about 1821, and purchased a farm on lot 7, where he died in 1832. The farm was occupied by members of the family for many years afterward. Children: Elizabeth (Mrs. James MALLORY and later Mrs. William M. OLDER), Dr. Benjamin, and Mary J. (Mrs. Allen BRIGGS and afterward Mrs. Alanson CAMPBELL). Porter McCLUER and Abner HOYT owned parts of lot 7.

David McCLUER, a cousin of Joseph McCLUER, arrived in this town from Vermont in April, 1806 and selected the north part of lot 5, a few rods below the village of Cadiz, where Hiram Warner McCLUER was born April 30, 1806, being the first child of Saxon origin born within the limits of Cattaraugus county. Mr. McCLUER removed from Franklinville to Allegany with his family about 1836 and resided there until his death. He was supervisor of Ischua in 1822. Hiram W. McCLUER still resides in Allegany.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 660

Surnames: McKERNAN, PHILLIPS, WILLIAMS

Thomas McKERNAN, son of Thomas, was born in County Caven, Ireland, in 1823, and came with his son Hugh to Scottsville, N. Y., in 1848, where he was engaged in manufacturing barrel hoops. His wife, Ann PHILLIPS, whom he had married in Ireland, came to join her husband in 1849, bringing with her their children, James and Mary. After residing in Scottsville, Holley, and Eagle for brief periods the family moved to Ellicottville in 1866 and settled on a farm, where he died Oct. 18, 1879. His wife died Nov. 5, 1880. Children: a daughter who died in infancy, Hugh, Joseph, Frank, Thomas, John, Michael, and James. James McKERNAN was born Nov. 12, 1846, and Oct. 6, 1867 married Susan M., daughter of S. R. and Prudence WILLIAMS. Children: William, Joseph, John, Thomas, Catherine, Simeon, Helen, James, and Josephine.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 660

Surnames: McNALL, WASHBURN, SEWARD

William McNALL, oldest son of John and Mellison (WASHBURN) McNALL, was born Feb. 23, 1806, at Stafford Springs, Conn., and died Dec. 20, 1870, in this town, whither he had removed with his parents in 1816. The family settled in Cadiz. Dec. 17, 1829, he married Sibyl, daughter of Stephen SEWARD. Children: Charles (deceased), William, Jr. (deceased), Nathan (died March 5, 1857), Thomas E. (killed at Morton's Ford, Va., in 1864), Stephen E., and four daughters. Stephen McNALL was supervisor of this town in 1888.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 660 & 661

Surnames: McVEAN, GILLESPIE, VAN AERNAM, SPRING, BUTTON

Rev. D. C. McVEAN was born Oct. 10, 1818, in Caledonia, N. Y. His parents settled on the farm where he was raised in 1816. His twin brother, John C. McVEAN, still resides on the homestead. After receiving the usual drill of a village school, D. C. studied at Cambridge, N. Y., and Cleveland, Ohio. In after years he said that while a boy working on a farm a premonition sometimes came over him that he should preach the gospel. His mother was left a widow and his labor was needed at home. At the age of seventeen, on profession of faith in his Master, he united with the United Presbyterian church of Caledonia. He graduated at Union College in 1844 and was licensed to preach in June, 1847. After laboring as a licentiate in the New England States and in the south he accepted a call from the Lyndon church in this county and was ordained and installed pastor Jan. 29, 1850. During the sixteen years he labored there the church grew and prospered. The membership was scattered, yet he was indefatigable in his work. After the resignation of his charge at Lyndon his labors were mostly confined to Franklinville, where he resided, and where by his efforts a nucleus was formed around which gathered those who afterward formed the membership of the First United Presbyterian church of Franklinville, which was organized by Mr. McVEAN on June 25, 1867 with forty members, and now there 214 communicants. An epidemic soon afterward broke out in the community and during his visits he became the victim of the disease, and while he was preaching on the last Sabbath before his death he was stricken with this malady and died the following Saturday. Mr. McVEAN married M. J., daughter of Abram GILLESPIE, of Orange county, N. Y. Their only son, Creighton, died at the age of seventeen. In 1848 Mr. McVEAN, Dr. Henry VAN AERNAM, and Hon. S. S. SPRING located in Franklinville. To the united efforts of these three men, aided by Hon. J. K. BUTTON, the citizens of Franklinville and adjacent towns and indebted for the endowment of Ten Broeck Free Academy.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 661

Surnames: MEAD, CLARK, McKEAN, HOE, ROMEYN, ELY, DAY, GIDDINGS, McGUIRE, TREADWELL, PACKARD, JOHNSTON

The MEAD family – Tradition has it that three brothers came from England before the Revolutionary war and settled in Greenwich, Conn.; most of their descendants settled elsewhere in New England. Merlin MEAD, son of Clark, was born in South Salem (now Lewisboro), Westchester county, Aug. 18, 1794, and at seventeen began teaching district school in the winter, working on his father's farm summers. After his marriage, Nov. 14, 1820, to Polly, eldest daughter of Eli CLARK, of Waterbury, Conn., he removed to New York city and in connection with Mrs. MEAD continued teaching about ten years with the subsequently famous Mr. McKEAN. They opened an evening school, teaching two hours each evening, charging simply for light and fuel. Richard and Robert HOE, the inventors of the celebrated printing press, were among his pupils. Mr. and Mrs. MEAD united with the Cedar Street Presbyterian church under the pastorate of Dr. J. B. ROMEYN. Owing to Mrs. MEAD's failing health they removed to Cattaraugus county in the fall of 1830, settling in the village of Franklinville. With his brother-in-law, the late Seth ELY, who preceded him by two years, he kept tavern in a building erected for the purpose (standing near where W. A. DAY's buildings now are). Mr. MEAD taught the district school in the old red school house two winters. As Mr. and Mrs. MEAD came with a "gift" (A communion plate, still in use, presented by three young men of New York City) in their hand to the Presbyterian church of Franklinville, they esteemed it their greatest joy to unite with that church, which they did by letter on the first Sunday after their arrival, and Mr. MEAD was elected and ordained an elder, remaining such till his death, being also elected clerk of the session, trustee, clerk of the society, etc. Nov. 14, 1870, they celebrated their golden wedding. In politics Mr. MEAD was in early days a Whig, becoming afterward an Abolitionist. He died at his home in Cadiz, Dec. 23, 1874; Mrs. MEAD died May 19, 1882. Children: Thomas Ely, born Aug. 10, 1821, died Aug. 28, 1822; Maria S., born July 30, 1824, married J. C. GIDDINGS on July 4, 1849, and now lives in Venango Pa.; Romeyn, born March 22, 1827, married Mrs. Jane B. McGUIRE on Oct. 12, 1871, and now lives in McMinnville, Tenn.; Lois Rebecca, born Sept. 16, 1830, married Aaron TREADWELL, settled in Redding, Fairfield county, Conn., and she died Oct. 16, 1888; Rhoda Ely, born Dec. 17, 1833; Eli Clark, born Aug. 1, 1836, died Jan. 3, 1839; Aaron Benedict, born Nov. 7, 1838, married Mary E. PACKARD on Sept. 2, 1868, and now lives in Chicago, Ill.; and Merlin Edward, born Aug. 18, 1842, married Isabella W. JOHNSTON, March 7, 1877, and resides in Cadiz.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 661 & 662

Surnames: MITCHELL, YULE, CURRIE

William MITCHELL, with his wife and sons Alexander, Thomas, and John and daughters Janet and Agnes, emigrated from Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1834, and settled on a part of lot 6 in the town of Freedom. Respected by his neighbors for his moral and religious worth his house was the ministers' home, and through his influence a branch of the United Presbyterian church of Lyndon was formed and sustained during his life. He died in 1860, aged seventy-six; his widow died in 1874, aged eighty-five. Alexander, after living in York, N. Y., a number of years, returned to Freedom and was elected justice of the peace in 1857, which office he held until his death in 1875. He was largely identified with all the public affairs of the town, settled satisfactorily many family estates, and always used his influence to prevent litigation. Janet married James YULE and settled in Eagle, Wyoming county, where their family still remains. Agnes married Andrew CURRIE, of Lyndon, where she lives with her sons. John was elected justice of the peace in Freedom in 1876 and held that office until his removal to Franklinville, where he and Thomas now reside.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 662

Surnames: MORGAN, McCLUER, CAMPBELL

Henry MORGAN, son of Samuel and Sarah MORGAN, was born in Cherry Valley Otsego county, April 2, 1806. It is a noteworthy coincidence that while Gen. Joseph McCLUER was taking the initiatory steps toward developing the future town of Franklinville, a child should be born in a distant part of the State destined to play such a conspicuous part in its history. Of Mr. MORGAN's early life but little is known, except that he received a common school education that was scarcely up to the standard even of those early times. But what he failed to acquire from teachers was amply compensated for by his strong, vigorous intellect and his instinctive love of knowledge. After he fully developed into manhood, many of the intricate problems in the sciences were solved as if by intuition, especially so in the mathematics. He was kind hearted and sympathetic, and easily moved by the misfortunes of those about him, yet he was eccentric in his modes of charity. He was ready in case of need to do what he could by his own labor, or to furnish a team, or himself and team, or supply food such as he had to spare; but it is not known that he ever bestowed money. When property was turned into cash it was carefully laid by. He was no miser, yet he was not a spendthrift; he was industrious and fruga1. In 1833, in company with his parents and three sisters, he removed to this town and settled on lot 51, town four, range five, a tract of land then known as the Big Elm flats, since known as MORGAN hollow. Here during the succeeding four years he underwent the toils and privations of pioneer life. In 1837 he rented what was then known as the "Half-way House," and with the family left, for the time being, his home in the "Hollow." For about four years he acted as host, hostler, and farmer. In 1841 he returned with the family to his home on the "Elm flats." Soon after his father died and two of his sisters married, and thus he became the head of a family consisting of himself, his aged mother, and a sister, for whom he ever provided with a bountiful hand. Thus situated he continued to reside on his farm in MORGAN hollow twenty-five years. In 1866 he sold his farm in the hollow and purchased of Robert CAMPBELL a farm of fifty acres, on which he resided a few years. Soon after his mother's death he removed with his sister Almira to Cadiz, where her death occurred a few years later. Afterward his sister, Mrs. Eliza CAMPBELL, and her husband remained with him until his death, which occurred at Cadiz after a brief illness Oct. 8, 1881.

A few years prior to his death, Mr. MORGAN held consultation with some of his friends concerning the propriety of having a town hall. After a few interviews of this nature the subject was not again mentioned by him to anyone except to his attorney. His mind was of the argumentative type; he reasoned from cause and effect, and his beliefs were mainly based on such propositions as could be demonstrated. He regarded all phenomena as the effect of natural, though often either of obscure or invisible causes. His intellect was adapted to deal with the physical sciences rather than with those of the metaphysical and psychological. He believed in the existence of God and in the immortality of the soul, and derived his belief from the material universe. Near the close of his life, and after those who had affectionately clung to him to the last had passed to the palace of rest, he decided to bequeath to the town of Franklinville the larger portion of his property for the purpose of erecting a town hall. After Henry MORGAN's munificent bequest of about $8,000 a magnificent building was erected, on which, in bas-relief, are two words, MORGAN HALL.

There are three names that will ever remain green in the hearts of the people of Franklinville: Gen. Jos. McCLUER, Peter TEN BROECK, and Henry MORGAN.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 663

Surnames: MORRIS, STILLWELL, PATTERSON

John MORRIS and his father, Thomas, came to Franklinville from New Jersey, in 1807. Thomas MORRIS selected lot 38 and erected a dwelling house upon it. During the same summer he opened a store on the ground now occupied by the residence of the late Horatio STILLWELL. Mr. MORRIS was supervisor of the town of Ischua (now Franklinville) in 1818, 1819, 1820 and 1822 and of Franklinville in 1846, 1847, and 1848. John was born in 1802 and in 1823 married Lovina, daughter of John PATTERSON, and had ten children.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 663

Surnames: MYERS, CAMPBELL

Samuel B. MYERS was born in Portage, N. Y., June 30, 1842. Feb. 14, 1865, he enlisted in Co. B, 154th Ill. Vols., and was mustered out May 22d following. Nov. 15, 1880, he married Mary E., daughter of Albert J. and Permelia C. CAMPBELL, of Franklinville.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 663

Surnames: OAKES, LEONARD, MORGAN, CLEVELAND, CROSBY

Elijah OAKES is a son of Elijah, who served in the Revolutionary war. At an early day the father settled in Rochester and moved thence in 1839 to Franklinville, where he located a farm of fifty acres, which he cleared. He married Joannah LEONARD, who bore him twelve children, of whom Elijah, Jr., was born Feb. 10, 1835, and Oct. 20, 1856, married Sarah C., daughter of Hiram and Harriet C. MORGAN, of Franklinville. In Sept., 1864, Mr. OAKES enlisted in Co. A, 187th N. Y. Vols., participated in the battle of Hatcher's Run, and was discharged in March, 1865. Returning to his farm, he resided there until 1880 when he moved to Cadiz. Mrs. OAKES died Oct. 24, 1881, and he married, second, Katie, daughter of Freeman and Maryette CLEVELAND. His children are Manley C., Willie V., and Ella E. (Mrs. B. CROSBY).

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 663 - 665

Surnames: OLDER, MARVIN, MOORE, SMITH, JEWELL, PERKINS, REYNOLDS

Marvin OLDER was born in Middletown, Delaware county, Aug. 22, 1810. A few days after his birth the Hon. Dudley MARVIN called at the house of his parents and suggested that the tiny specimen of humanity before him be christened Marvin. The name was agreed to by common consent, and ever since he has answered to it. His parents, William and Hannah OLDER, raised sixteen children, Marvin being the sixth son and eighth child. In 1815 his parents with their family removed to Otisco, Onondago county, where they remained three years. Mr. OLDER has jacously remarked that, during that time, there was nothing pertaining to the narration of his life "except that I invariably stood at the head of my class in district school, from the fact that there were but two in the class, and one of them at least was lamentably underwitted," which of course was the other fellow. On the 16th of July, 1818, William OLDER unloaded his household appendages from an emigrant wagon by the side of an excellent spring on the northeast corner of lot 25, township five, range four, of the Holland Land Company's purchase. This location was then in the original town of Ischua, which at that date included the entire north half of the county of Cattaraugus. It is now in the town of Farmersville, one and one-half miles northeast from the village of Franklinville. The location for the last seventy-three years has been known as OLDER hill. At that time there was but one school house in the whole country. Marvin's father was a cooper, and the shop became the school room of the young student. His library consisted of a Bible and psalm book, Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, Young's Night Thoughts, Hervy's Meditations, an antiquated dictionary whose first pages contained a condensed synopsis of English grammar in its most incomprehensible and mysterious form, Dwight's Geography, Dilworth's and Daboll's Arithmetics, the American Preceptor, Webster's Spelling Book, Esop's Fables, Robinson Crusoe, and Charlotte Temple. Such were the surroundings of the mere stripling when he commenced the struggle for intellectual development. Without the privilege of attending school, and with an unquenchable desire to obtain knowledge, home study became a passion as well as a necessity. In that cooper shop, with the shavings that fell from his father's drawing-knife for a light, a barrel-head for a slate, and a piece of coal for a pencil, many a knotty problem yielded to his persevering efforts.

From the age of thirteen to fifteen years, Marvin attended the district school in the old log school house which stood a short distance north of the village of Franklinville; two months to Miss Louie MOORE (since Mrs. SMITH, of Hinsdale) and about the same length of time to Pardon T. JEWELL; and afterward eleven and a half days to Eleazer PERKINS. This rounded him up and polished him off as an accomplished scholar of the period. In the autumn of 1828 he entered upon his first term as a teacher, and at intervals, both summer and winter, has followed the profession through a period of forty years, having in all taught what is equal to fifteen years without recess or vacation. It is balm of Gilead to the heart of Mr. OLDER at this time, when the shadows of life are lengthening, to know that he has no warmer or more faithful friends than those old-time pupils who received the first rudiments of an English education from him. Of the nine sons in his father's family Marvin alone remains; of the daughters three survive and reside in the west.

On the 17th of July, 1836, Marvin married Diantha T. REYNOLDS, of East Bloomfield, Ontario county, who was born in Sullivan, Madison county, Feb. 23, 1816. There have been born to them four sons and six daughters. Their oldest child (a son) died in infancy; of the other sons, Robert E. and William M. served in the army during the Rebellion. Robert E. was killed near Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864; William M. was wounded and captured in the valley of the Shenandoah and died of starvation in Andersonville, Ga., Aug 22, 1864. The remaining son, Wallis M., died at Franklinville, Dec. 24, 1878. Of the daughters five are or have been teachers and all are married.

Oct. 24, 1861, Mr. OLDER enlisted in Co. I, 6th N. Y. Vol. Cav., and after a brief period of camp drill at Staten Island, N. Y., the regiment was sent to the front early in the summer of 1862, and was successively under command of Generals PLEASANTON, AVERILL, CUSTER, and SHERIDAN. Soon after the organization of the regiment he was detailed on extra duty as clerk in the quartermaster's and commissary's departments in the field, which positions gave additional comforts and duties. This relieved him from ordinary duties of the rank and file, yet he participated in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredericksburg, and came out free from bruise or scratch. On the night of the last day of April, 1863, he was one of a squad of seventy, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel McVICKER, who, being on a reconnaissance, suddenly found themselves in the darkness of a foggy night, surrounded on all sides by the enemy enroute for the historic heights of Chancellorsville. Mr. OLDER says of this adventure:

"To stay and fight would be sheer madness; to tamely submit would be cowardice; and the only way was to hew a road with the sabre in a desperate charge. The latter alternative was adopted; some succeeded and reached the main body, and some fell in the encounter. I was among the latter, and when I had, after a severe effort, collected the scattered fragments of what little intellect I once possessed, I found myself half buried in mud, with my head sadly battered by a sabre-stroke and a dead horse across my legs. I drew myself from beneath my dead horse and crawled to a little mound beneath some dwarf pines and communed with myself in sober, almost in dead, earnest. There was nothing to disturb or vary my gloomy forebodings except the groans of the wounded, the twinges of acute pain, the moaning of the chill night wind, and the heavy rumble of artillery trains on the distant pikes enroute for the bloody scenes of the coming morrow. I had dragged from my saddle two blankets, an overcoat, and a haversack of provisions, but of these, as soon as it was light, the vandal hounds relieved me. We were then taken to some farm buildings hard by, and suffered to sun ourselves and nurse our wrath on the south side of an old out-house. Toward night we were taken to Spotslyvania Court House and our wounds dressed, and the next day I, with two others who were unable to walk, was loaded into a dump-cart drawn by a dilapidated mule, and started on our triumphal march to the city of Richmond! After much fatigue, many delays, privations, and starvations, we arrived at our destination, and were at once escorted to that historic watering place, Belle Isle, and subsequently to that fashionable resort, the 'Hotel de Libby,' where we were treated to rebel hospitality by way of the naked floor for a bed, the grimmy old roof for a covering, gray-backs for recreation, mule soup for refreshment, and river water for a beverage. But all things have an end, and so did my imprisonment. I was returned on parol by way of Petersburg, City Point, James River, Fortress Monroe, and Annapolis to convalescent camp near, the city of Washington, where we arrived in July, 1863. I was immediately detailed as a clerk in the ordnance department, and for merit was promoted to the first rank in the office, and the order of detail was made permanent by the endorsement of the secretary of war, in which position I remained until the close of the term of my enlistment, when I returned to my family a poor, battered, time-worn veteran of the war."

Mr. OLDER's life has been one of changes. He has labored in the field and has held official positions; he has taught common schools, and has been at the head of polite literary circles. For ten years he held the chairmanship of the Regents' Board of Examiners in TEN BROECK Free Academy, and filled the position with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of all concerned. In disposition he is unobtrusive and retiring, and the positions he has held are those in which his services have been next to indispensable.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 665

Surnames: PATRIDGE, ELLIS, MORGAN, WARING

Maj. Flavel PATRIDGE was a native of Wilbraham, Mass. His wife was Azubah ELLIS, of Stafford Springs, Conn., and with one child, Frances C., they came to Franklinville in 1820, living in a small house where the MORGAN block now stands, where he carried on shoemaking and conducted a store. Major PATRIDGE was a prominent man in politics and held several positions of honor and responsibility. He was town supervisor in 1828, was postmaster a number of years, and a member of Assembly in 1829. He was a strong temperance advocate and an active member of the Presbyterian church. Of his nine children only one, Eliza A. (Mrs. James WARING), is living in town.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 665

Surnames: PATTERSON, STONE, ADAMS

John PATTERSON came from Onondaga county to the county of Wyoming in 1805, and moved thence to Franklinville in 1820. A few years later he purchased and settled on a farm. Mr. PATTERSON was well known in the county as well as in his town. He was supervisor of Franklinville in 1830. He built a hotel about 1830 which he kept for several years and sold to Jarvis STONE, who kept it until his death. Between 1860 and 1870 the property was sold by the heirs and has since acquired the name of "Brown Eagle." Mr. STONE left three children: George, William, and Mary (Mrs. Russell ADAMS). John PATTERSON was the first collector in Franklinville after its organization in 1824.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 666

Surnames: PHILLIPS, McCLUER, GARLICK, LAIDLAW, SCHUTZ, VAN SLYKE, HARRISON

Peter PHILLIPS, from Kinderhook, this State, came to Franklinville about 1831 and married Mrs. Samuel McCLUER. Children: William W., born March 9, 1835; Charles W., born March 17, 1837; and David L., born June 9, 1839.

Otis W. PHILLIPS, son of John, came from Chenango county to the town of Franklinville in 1833 and settled on what is now South Main street in the village, where he died May 19, 1888. His wife was Phebe GARLICK, who bore him eight daughters and three sons. He was a carpenter and built many of the best houses in the town. As a citizen he was highly respected and as a politician he became very popular, being supervisor of his town in 1844. Five of his children are living: Sarah M. (Mrs. James LAIDLAW); Phebe M. (Mrs. Charles SCHUTZ); L. A. (Mrs. Egbert VAN SLYKE of Great Valley; Delia M. (Mrs. Truman HARRISON); and Otis H.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 666

Surnames: PIERCE, FAY, SIMONDS

William PIERCE came to Franklinville in 1832, from Genesee county, and settled on Genesee street. There were four children: Harriet, John, Ellen (Mrs. Cyrus FAY), and Lorette. He sold to Mr. SIMONDS in 1859 and removed.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 666

Surnames: PRATT, McCLUER, COWLES, HOLDEN, GREEN

Ira PRATT, one of the axeman who accompanied Joseph McCLUER while surveying the Holland Land Company's land, settled in the Ischua valley, but just when and where can not be ascertained. A grandson of Joseph McCLUER states that Mr. PRATT married one of the general's sisters and resided in the town from 1806 to about 1836. They had three children: Orvil, Lucy, and a second son. Orvil went to California and became a Supreme Court judge. There was a vein of dry humor in Ira PRATT's composition which often proved amusing, but sometimes rather annoying to those of whom he made a target. In 1831 Austin COWLES had come into possession of the Conrad grist-mill below Cadiz. His occupation was preaching the gospel and grinding the grists. On one occasion Ira PRATT had taken a grist to mill, but in some mysterious way the grain was lost and COWLES refused to pay for it. PRATT sued and recovered judgment, whereupon COWLES put up this notice:

"Franklinville, March 26, 1831"

WHEREAS, Ira PRATT has commenced a prosecution against the firm of the Franklinville mills for property left thereat, and pretended to be lost by said PRATT; this is therefore to forbid any person leaving grain or other property at said mills on his account, as the subscriber Gives this Notice that he will not hereafter Receive Said Ira PRATT's property in safe Keeping.

"AUSTIN COWLES."

To which PRATT replied:

"The Publick are hereby requested to take notice that I forbid Austin COWLES (late miller) preaching or attempting to preach, and all persons are forbid to permit the said COWLES to preach in their houses, outhouses, sheds, or yards any where in my Diocese on pain of my displeasure. Dated at Franklinville this 28th day of March A. D. 1831.

"ELDER BLOSS"

P. S. I also forbid Austin COWLES, late miller of Franklinville, taking extra tole from me, or from any of my church, on pain of my displeasure.

"E. B."

Noah PRATT, son of John, was born June 12, 1832, in Ashford, and when twenty-one married Jane M., daughter of Arnold HOLDEN. In 1866 he moved to Franklinville on the farm where B. J. GREEN now resides, where he lived until 1870 when he purchased his present farm. Children: Edwin H., Albert L., Alice B., and Edith M.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 666 & 667

Surnames: REYNOLDS, SEARL, GLADDING, RYTHER, RANSBURY

John REYNOLDS and his wife, Permelia SEARL, and one child, Marilla, came from Washington county to Franklinville in 1819 or ‘20 and settled on the farm now occupied by their son Dennis. Five of their eight children are living: Henry, Dennis, Maria, Marietta, and Marilla. Mr. REYNOLDS died Feb. 6, 1865, and his wife July 29, 1884. Dennis REYNOLDS, born Aug. 1, 1824, married, in 1849, Wealthy, daughter of Jeremiah and Roxey H. (GLADDING) RYTHER, and until 1865 was a farmer on East hill. In that year he removed to the REYNOLDS homestead. Children: Stewart, Dwight, Millard, and Fred, of whom only the last named is living. Henry REYNOLDS was born March 4, 1822, and married, in 1850, Harriet J., daughter of Nathaniel RANSBURY, who came to this town in 1844 and settled on East hill. Mr. REYNOLDS was also a farmer on East hill, but in 1887 moved to Cadiz. He has one son, Melvin L.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 667

Surnames: RIGGS, BROOKS, McGEORGE

Lewis C. RIGGS, son of Dr. Lewis RIGGS (see page 130) was born July 14, 1845. On Sept. 21, 1868, he married Martha J., daughter of Matthew and Louisa (BROOKS) McGEORGE, and in 1872 assumed charge of the RIGGS homestead in Franklinville. Mr. RIGGS, like his father, is well posted in agricultural matters and devotes his time solely to the care of the paternal farm. He is a breeder of Hambletonian horses, Holstein cattle, and Cotswold sheep.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 667

Surnames: ROGERS, SEARL

Nathaniel ROGERS, a native of Massachusetts, came to Franklinville in 1850 settling on a farm on East hill, where he died. He was a worthy member of the Presbyterian church, and had born to him seven children, of whom two are living in this county, viz.: Levi, of Humphrey, and. Mrs. S. S. SEARL.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 667

Surnames: ROOT, MERRILL, ADAMS, HARRISON, BARRON, FRANK, PIERSON, CLEAVELAND, BOWEN

Oliver ROOT came from York, Livingston county, about the year 1818 and located on lot 41. He married Zulama MERRILL. He built a saw-mill, the first one in that locality. An incident characteristic of those hardy pioneers occurred at the raising of this mill. After the frame was up, they all repaired to the log house, where Oliver snugly seated his guests in as nearly a semicircle as the stools, chairs, and benches at his command would permit. He then mixed a quantity of whisky and sugar in a tin pan, and with a large spoon commenced at one end of the half circle, giving the first a spoonful, then the next, and so on to the end of the line. The operation was continued, until that crowd was as jolly a set of fellows as a mixture of whisky, sugar, and good nature ever make. Mr. ROOT lived on the place until his death Feb. 18, 1872; his wife died Feb. 18, 1875. They had twelve children, two of whom are now living on the homestead. Warren S. married Sarah, daughter of George ADAMS; children: Alice C., Charles D. and George W. Clarinda married Mark HARRISON, resides in the south part of the town, and has one son, Truman. Noah M. ROOT, another son of Oliver, was born Nov. 16, 1820, and married Betsey, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth BARRON, of Franklinville. He settled and cleared a farm and died Aug. 9, 1877. His widow married J. D. FRANK and resides in Great Valley. Children: Sabra M. (Mrs. Benjamin PIERSON), Huldah E. (Mrs. B. C. CLEAVELAND), and Loren F. The latter was born Sept. 29, 1850, and married Laura J., daughter of Calvin C. BOWEN. He resided on the old homestead until 1886, when he moved to the village of Franklinville, where he engaged in the insurance business with J. C. BOWEN. 

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 667 & 668

Surnames: SEARL, HOTCHKISS, JOHNSON, RANSBURY, SILL, HOLMES, BURLINGAME, FARWELL, SARLES, ROGERS, MORRIS, SCOTT, HOWARD, BARD, McCLUER

Isaac SEARL was the second son of fifteen children of Gideon and Hannah SEARL, and was born in Whitehall, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1789. Of this large family, six brothers and five sisters of Isaac have resided in Cattaraugus county. In July, 1811, Mr. SEARL married Martha HOTCHKISS, of Washington county, and in 1816 moved with his family to Warsaw, N. Y., coming thence in the fall of 1817 to Franklinville, where he died April 11, 1860. His first settlement in this town was on land occupied by the Globe Hotel, but from this he soon removed to a farm, where he erected a log house, and where he dispensed for many years a generous hospitality. Mr. SEARL united with the Baptist church in April, 1837, and from then until the close of his life he was an exemplary member of that society. He had nine children, some of whom survive. Mr. SEARL was supervisor of Ischua in 1823 and of Franklinville in 1824-27, 1831, 1836-37, 1840, and 1845 – ten terms in all.

Isaac SEARL Jr., son of Isaac, was born Sept. 22, 1820, and has always lived in Franklinville. He has been a life-long farmer, at the present time being one of the most extensive agriculturists in the town. Like his respected father he has taken a lively interest in town affairs, serving as supervisor in 1861 and 1862 and again from 1868 to 1872 inclusive, and as assessor and poormaster. He married Jane, daughter of John JOHNSON. She died Jan. 11, 1883.

Orange SEARL, son of Isaac, Sr., was born Jan. 8, 1816, and came with the family to Franklinville, where he has always been a farmer. He removed to Cadiz in 1875, and is now one of the oldest pioneers in the town. He married Elizabeth A., daughter of Nathaniel RANSBURY.

Lyman SEARL, son of Isaac, Sr., was born May 22, 1818, and occupies the homestead farm of his father, having been almost a life-long resident of a single school district, and following since his boyhood the avocation of a farmer. He married Hannah M., daughter of Elijah SILL (q. v.); children: Lucian H., Viola E., and Henriette (Mrs. Luther M. HOLMES).

Samuel SEARL was born Jan. 13, 1812. He was a son of Isaac and Martha (HOTCHKISS) SEARL, and he married, Sept. 19, 1835, Sophronia, daughter of Ira and Elizabeth BURLINGAME. Settling first on East hill, he removed thence in 1851 to the farm now occupied by his son Fayette. Mr. SEARL held several positions of trust, was a member of the Board of Supervisors in 1858, and was an exemplary member and deacon of the Baptist church. Of his two children, Fayette and Hanford, the latter, born June 25, 1837, enlisted in June, 1861, in Co. K, 85th N. Y. Vols., was promoted orderly-sergeant, was taken sick in front of Yorktown, and was taken to the hospital at Annapolis, Md., where he died May 3, 1862. Samuel SEARL died Feb. 17, 1865; his wife died July 25, 1857. Fayette SEARL, born March 7, 1846, married, March 18, 1867, Susan C. FARWELL, of Ischua, and lives on the homestead.

Jeriah SEARL, born in Hampton, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1788, died in Franklinville in April, 1863. He married in 1815 Rachel SARLES, and carried on farming and manufactured chairs. In 1835. with his wife and four children, he moved to Franklinville, settling on a farm of 115 acres on East hill. For fifty years Mr. SEARL was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Cadiz and for thirty years was class-leader. His wife was born May 28, 1787, and died Sept. 4, 1867. Children: Almond D., Caroline C. (Mrs. J. W. SILL), Lucy B., and Samuel S. The latter was born May 23, 1824, and in 1858 married Lucretia, daughter of Nathaniel ROGERS. Settling on a farm on East hill, which he cultivated a number of years, he moved to Franklinville village in 1885. Children: Cora M. (Mrs. Clarence MORRIS), Clifton R., Marshall J., and Arthur J. Almond D. SEARL was born Dec. 4, 1815, and came with his parents to this town in 1835. He married Jane, daughter of Edward and Lucinda SCOTT, and settled on the farm now occupied by his son E. E. He died in 1882. Children: Dolson B., Emily, Covil J., Walter H., Julia C., Electa M., Lucy L., Frank E., Elmer E., Ellen J., and Agnes S.

Gideon SEARL, a native of Washington county, came to Cadiz at an early day and engaged in mercantile trade. He subsequently removed to Ischua, where he followed the same business and was elected a member of Assembly in 1846 upon the Whig ticket. He finally returned to Franklinville and became postmaster, and was accidentally killed by the cars. His wife was Lorania HOWARD, by whom he had seven children, four of whom are living: Cynthia A. (Mrs. S. P. BARD), Gideon, O. S., and Roxanna (Mrs. J. H. McCLUER). Mr. SEARL was much respected, and the positions he filled he honored with a noble manliness and a strict integrity.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 669

Surname: SEWARD

Stephen SEWARD came from Decatur, N. Y., in April, 1827, and put up a double log house, which was considered aristocratic in those days. He settled on the east part of lot 21. He was a man of much decision of character and manifested a good deal of public spirit. James SEWARD, son of Stephen, came to Franklinville with his father in 1827 and settled on lot 21. He was a man of some ability and perseverance; he became captain of militia, and his influence in society was good. Orrin M. SEWARD served as supervisor of this town in 1855 and Thomas held the same office in 1841 and 1842.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 669

Surnames: SEXTON, BABCOCK, STARKWEATHER, FRANK, NORTON

David C. SEXTON, a native of Rhode Island, came to Cazenovia, N. Y., where he resided until 1825, when he came to Rushford, Allegany county, with his family. There he followed the trade of carpenter and builder until his death in 1843. Hezekiah C. SEXTON, his son, born April 28, 1804, came to Rushford with his father, and Dec. 16, 1824, married Maria, daughter of Elisha BABCOCK, of Cazenovia, who was born in 1807. Mr. SEXTON took up a farm where Rushford village now is, and was deputy sheriff of Allegany county for several years. In 1845 he came to Freedom and a few years later to Cadiz, where he kept hotel until about 1870. He died Nov. 14, 1885, and his wife Jan. 16, 1890. Children: Melinda D. (Mrs. STARKWEATHER), of Buffalo; Emily E. (adopted), wife of Dr. T. F. FRANK, of Pittsburg, Pa.; and Elisha D., born June 26, 1830. For six years Elisha was employed by Beach, Wheeler & Co., of Buffalo, as traveling solicitor. June 15, 1857, he married Eliza H., daughter of Bela NORTON, of Hinsdale, and soon after settled on a farm near Cadiz, where he lived till 1885, when he moved to Franklinville. He has one daughter, Belle D. Mr. SEXTON is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 669

Surnames: SILL, ARNOLD, FARWELL, SEARL, GUTHRIE, LINDERMAN, REYNOLDS, CONRAD

William SILL was born in Connecticut, Sept. 25, 1786. His wife, Harriet ARNOLD, was born May 10, 1796. They were married in Victor, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1815. With three brothers – Deodatus, Elijah, and Alonzo – he came to Franklinville about 1820 and settled in the south part of the town. He died Aug. 30, 1839, and his wife Oct. 1, 1859. Children: John W., Caroline H., Elijah B., Thomas M., Chloe A. (drowned), Charlotte A., Phebe A., Andrew J., Alonzo D., and Mark. Thomas M. SILL, born in May, 1822, married, Sept. 13, 1849, Sarah M. FARWELL, of Ischua, and settled on a part of the A. J. SILL estate, but subsequently removed to the farm on which his widow now lives, where he died in May, 1886. Children: Elon M., Viletta M. (Mrs. E. E. SEARL), Enos K., and Carrie G. (Mrs. Edwin GUTHRIE, Jr.). Andrew J. SILL was born Oct. 29, 1832, in Franklinville. He married, Jan. 4, 1860, Mary A., daughter of Nicholas and Rebecca LINDERMAN, of Ischua, and settled on the homestead, where he resided until 1884, when he moved to the village of Franklinville, where he died July 4, 1889. His widow and three children – Mrs. H. R. REYNOLDS, Aggie and Will N. – reside in Franklinville.

Deodatus SILL, brother of William, settled about 1820 on the farm now owned by Dennis REYNOLDS, where he died. He had ten children.

Elijah SILL, brother of William, married Margaret, daughter of Henry CONRAD. He resided in Franklinville from his settlement in 1820 until about 1833, when he removed to Hinsdale, but four years later returned. Eight years afterward he moved to Hinsdale again, where he died.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 669 & 670

Surnames: SIMONDS, KILBORN, JAMESON

O. H. C. SIMONDS was born in Brownville, N. Y., in 1808. When quite young he came with his father, John SIMONDS, to Alexander, Genesee county, where he resided until after his majority. He married Laura KILBORN, of Canandaigua, N. Y., Nov. 3, 1830. Coming to this town from Genesee on May 6, 1831, he settled on lot 46, on the road afterward called Genesee street. He taught school a number of winters and his remarkable powers of explanation rendered him an excellent teacher. He took a great interest in the early Sunday schools and did much to make them successful. He has been town superintendent of common schools and commissioner of highways. Children: Mary, Philo, Ellen, Julia, Sabra, Justin, and Harriet, of whom Philo, Ellen, Julia, and Sabra are living. Mrs. SIMONDS died May 6, 1889. Julia, the widow of William JAMESON, resides on the farm with her father. Justin enlisted in Co. A, 100th N. Y. Vols., and was killed at Fort Wagner, July 18, 1863. The following is taken from a letter of his dated "Camp near the Chickahomony, June 13, 1862":

"We crossed the Chickahomony at Bottom's Bridge on the 23d and were kept on constant picket duty for more than a week at Fair Oaks Station. At the battle of the 31st our division, of not more than 600 fighting men, was in the advance, and consequently was the first to receive the attack of the enemy, whose force was not less than 30,000. Yet it took them three hours to drive us back a half-mile. By this time the other divisions had come up and all were driven back another half-mile before dark. You can judge of the loss of the division by our company. We went in with thirty-six men and left fifteen on the field, including our captain and first lieutenant. Our second lieutenant has since died at Camp Scott, so it leaves our company without an officer. I succeeded in getting near enough to them to take the belt from a Louisiana Tiger, and I have it now."

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 670

Surnames: STORRS, CAMPBELL, MORSE, RATHBUN, INGALLS, NICHOLS, BRADLEY, FARRAR, GROW, ADAMS, PINDAR, ANTISDALE, PETTENGILL, HARVEY, EDDY

Thomas Denny STORRS, son of Nathaniel STORRS, was born in Mansfield, Conn., Feb. 11, 1782. When quite young he came with his father's family to Worcester, N. Y. April 8, 1804, he married Katharine, daughter of Alexander CAMPBELL, of Glasgow, Scotland, a brother of Robert CAMPBELL, of the same place. She was born in Rheinbeck, N. Y., Oct. 14, 1787. They resided in Worcester until April, 1827, when they came to Franklinville, arriving on the 25th. He settled on lot 37, which he had previously purchased of James O. MORSE and Benjamin RATHBUN. In the fall of 1827 he put up the first frame house on the street, clearing a place just a trifle larger than the building. Then the struggle for existence commenced. Not a rod of ground was cleared. on which to raise food, and to this wilderness home Mr. STORRS had brought his wife and six children. The principal meat for a time was venison, which was plentiful; corn bread, with now and then flour enough to make a shortcake, comprised the menu in those days. Mr. STORRS was a cooper, and by furnishing the asheries with pot and pearlash barrels and making black-salts he very soon established a comfortable home, where he resided until his death Aug. 19, 1874. Children: Martha (Mrs. Simeon INGALLS), Nirum, Alexander, William, Jehiel, George C., Lester, and Jane (Mrs. James H. NICHOLS). Nirum, born May 23, 1806, came with the family to Franklinville and settled on lot 29. He married Silva, daughter of James BRADLEY, of Middlefield, N. Y., at the home of Royal FARRAR in Machias, and the two lived together until May 10, 1878, when she died in Hinsdale. Children: Thomas, Barzilla, Phoebe, and Catherine. Alexander was a lawyer in Hinsdale; see page 331. His four children were Emery A., Rosette (Mrs. John A. GROW), Caroline (Mrs. John ADAMS), and Marshall, who died in infancy. Emery A. became a prominent member of the Chicago bar.

William STORRS was born in Worcester, N. Y., Jan. 20, 1810, and came to Franklinville with his father in 1827. June 1, 1834, he married Lydia, daughter of Edward and Rachel PINDAR, of Worcester, and they settled on a part of the homestead. In the autumn of 1840, he and his wife returned to Otsego. In the spring of 1841 he became pastor of the Baptist church in Jefferson, Schoharie county. In the summer of 1842 he became pastor of the Baptist church in the village of Lodi, town of Cherry Valley, N. Y., where he was ordained March 8, 1843. In addition to his ministerial work he has taught several terms of district, academic, and select schools. In Sept., 1861, he enlisted in Co. F, 76th N. Y. Vols., and was soon appointed military commander of the messroom. A few days later he was appointed commissary-sergeant, and held both positions until he was discharged in May, 1862, on account of disability. He returned to his home in Belmont, Allegany county, where his wife died Jan. 20, 1889. He now resides in Hinsdale.

George C. STORRS was born April 5, 1820, and was brought to Franklinville at the age of seven. He early developed a passionate love of books, which were the companions of his leisure moments. He soon turned his attention to mathematics, mastering branch after branch with a rapidity rarely equalled. He also became conversant with other studies. His habits of study led him to adopt teaching as a profession, which he followed for more than twenty years with marked success. In the sciences he was well versed and was also a fair scholar in the languages. He served two winters as clerk of a committee in the Assembly at Albany and over three years as an officer in Clinton prison at Dannemora, N. Y. Oct. 25, 1842, he married Mary J., daughter of Moses and Nancy ANTISDALE. Children: Mary (Mrs. Edwin PETTENGILL and later Mrs. Seward HARVEY), of Mansfield; Amelia, who died at the age of sixteen; Willard, who died in infancy; Lester; and Ida. (Mrs. Byron EDDY), of Eddyville. Lester resides on the homestead.

Lester STORRS was born May 23, 1822, and was brought with the family to Franklinville at the age of five years. He became a teacher at an early age and died Oct. 26, 1849, of consumption caused by over-study and a severe cold caught in the winter of 1847. In 1848 he taught two terms on Jackson hill in Cuba, N. Y., and one term in the academy at Richburg, Allegany county, in the spring of 1849.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 671

Surname: TEN BROECK

John TEN BROECK was a brother of Hon. Peter TEN BROECK (see page 278) and was born in Otsego county on March 11, 1797. He came to Farmersville in 1821 or 1822. He removed to the village of Franklinville in 1847, and died Sept. 15, 1866, his remains being buried in "TEN BROECK cemetery" under a costly monument prepared by his own direction. John TEN BROECK was a man almost the direct opposite of his honored brother. He was abrupt and eccentric but charitable, unpolished in etiquette and harsh in retort but kindhearted, and possessed excellent traits of character. From his first wife he obtained a divorce and the second bore him no children.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 671

Surnames: VAUGHAN, ROOD, LITCHFIELD

Joseph M. VAUGHAN came from Wayne county, Pa., in 1820 and settled in this town on lot 61. With a yoke of oxen he made the journey, bringing his wife, Lydia ROOD, to his home in the unbroken wilderness. Joseph M., Jr., their son and one of their nine children, was born May 21, 1808, and married Polly, daughter of Ensign LITCHFIELD, of Ellicottville; children: Abraham, Lucinda, Jessie, Joseph E., Almanza, Laura, Lydia, David G., Fred A., Harriet P., and Charles M. Abraham served in the Rebellion and died in the service.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 671 & 672

Surnames: WARING, BARD, PATRIDGE

William WARING and Catharine, his wife, came from Connecticut about 1821 and located on lot 33 on the farm now owned and occupied by their eldest son, John WARING. The family consisted of four sons and four daughters. The eldest daughter, Julia, is the wife of A. F. BARD of Port Allegany, Pa. The eldest son, John, is a prosperous farmer one mile north of Franklinville. The second son, James, now a dealer in general merchandise in Franklinville, was born in what is now Farmersville, April 6, 1821. In his youth he was apprenticed to a village blacksmith, and after his majority he erected a shop opposite the Globe Hotel, where he commenced business for himself, and soon after married Eliza, daughter of the Hon. Flavel PATRIDGE, and has four sons and three daughters, all living. The life of a village blacksmith soon became too monotonous for one of' Mr. WARING's versatile temperament and he tried farming with indifferent success, the sober realities of the profession oftentimes running counter to his ruling propensities to buy and sell. He has distributed vast sums of money to farmers in this vicinity for principally wool and butter. He has always shared a fair measure of public confidence, having held many offices of trust and emolument, and his life thus far has been financially a success. His friendships are warm and spontaneous, his dislikes and aversions are decisive.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 672

Surnames: WARNER, HOLLISTER

Moses WARNER, with his four sons, Moses, Jr., Parley, John, and Roswell, all from Vermont, settled on lot 5, township 4, range 5, in the summer of 1806, and three of the boys, on becoming of age, took parts of the same lot. But little is known concerning the old gentleman except that he was a cooper and worked at his trade. The mother left a legacy of good deeds behind her. She was an excellent nurse, and also possessed considerable skill in combatting diseases with roots and herbs. She was often called on to perform the more delicate duties usually assigned to the medical profession, and when such calls were made there was no night too dark or rough, no path too lonesome or obscure, no day too cold or stormy for Mother WARNER to hasten to the bedside where her services were needed. She possessed good health and a lithe, wiry frame, and never troubled herself or those around her for horse or carriage to take her to the sufferer's couch. Many a patient had reason to say "God bless you, Mother WARNER." She had a strong, well-balanced, intellect, and in short might be termed a walking volcano of wit, sarcasm, and good humor. The boys inherited their mother's constitution and many of her characteristics, and were noted for their courage, powers of endurance, and love of fun. John WARNER married Naomi HOLLISTER in 1811, theirs being the first marriage in the town.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 672

Surnames: WEED, CHANDLER, CROWLEY, HOGG

William Franklin WEED was born in Darien, Conn, June 3, 1811, and was the tenth child and fifth son of Nathan and Mary WEED. Nov. 14, 1831, he married Sarah W. CHANDLER and in May, 1834, came to this town. Children: Dexter C., Nathan F., and M. Adelie (Mrs. M. J. CROWLEY). Mrs. WEED died Sept. 10, 1876, and Oct. 9, 1877, Mr. WEED married Miss Ann E. HOGG. He was a leading factor in the material prosperity of the town; himself and sons were long identified with its financial, mercantile, moral, and educational progress. Nathan F., under the firm name of N. F. WEED & Co., started the first banking business in Franklinville and William F. was the first president of the first bank in town in 1872 and of the First National Bank at its organization in 1877. The latter represented Franklinville as supervisor from 1863 to 1866 inclusive and Nathan F. held the same office in 1867, 1880, and 1881.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 672

Surnames: WHITNEY, WILDER, BIRGE, BOND, McCLUER, SMITH, SHOWALTER

John WHITNEY, son of Christopher and Rhoda (WILDER) WHITNEY, was born in Hinsdale, March 14, 1830. At the age of sixteen he commenced learning the trade of harnessmaker in the employ of Norman BIRGE and three years later came to Franklinville, where he was employed by Ora BOND, whose harness business he purchased in 1851. Sept. 9, 1851, he married Mandana, daughter of Manly and Nancy McCLUER; children: Christopher, Emma (Mrs. Alfred SMITH), Fred M., Mandana (Mrs. V. SMITH), and Nettie (Mrs. William SHOWALTER). In Oct., 1861, Mr. WHITNEY enlisted in Co. I, 6th N. Y. Cav., and was discharged for disability March 16, 1863.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Pages 672 & 673

Surnames: WILLARD, REYNOLDS, BARD

Sherlock WILLARD, son of Daniel, was born in Massachusetts, Nov. 15, 1786. His wife, Elizabeth B. REYNOLDS, was born June 27, 1789. They came to this town in 1828 and settled first upon a farm then owned by Robert BARD and subsequently upon the place now occupied by their son Franklin P., where Mr. WILLARD died Aug. 31, 1846, and his Wife Oct. 29, 1871. Mr. WILLARD was a merchant before coming to Franklinville, but after his settlement here followed farming. Children: Elisha R., Sherlock B., Orville D., Chas. P., Erastus P., Augustus T., Franklin P., Sophia A., Louisa E., Hannah M., Mary E.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 673

Surnames: WILLIAMS, STERLING, MORGAN

Simeon R. WILLIAMS, son of Sylvester and Lydia (STERLING) WILLIAMS, was born in Granville, N. Y., April 23, 1814, and in 1838 came to the town of East Otto, where he purchased a small farm and erected thereon a log house. Nov. 5, 1838, he married Prudenda MORGAN, who bore him 16 children, 15 of whom grew to maturity. He moved to this town in 1853, and died March 19, 1885.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 673

Surnames: WOOD, SHEWMAN, GRAY, WHITE, SEWARD

Abram WOOD is the son of Solomon WOOD, who married Anna SHEWMAN, of New Jersey, and settled in Tompkins county, N. Y., where their first child, Abram, was born in 1830. In 1831 they came to Lyndon, where five more children were born: Harriet (Mrs. Sylvester GRAY), Halsey S., Horace A., Jane L. (Mrs. Montravill WHITE), and Allena L. The children of Mrs. Jane L. WHITE are Anna, Harry, and Catharine. Abram was reared a farmer, but became a contractor and builder, which he followed till his marriage in 1885 to Adelia B. SEWARD, when he returned to farming. His wife died in 1890.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 673

Surnames: WOODARD, MORGAN

Robert J. WOODARD, son of Asa and Mary WOODARD, was born April 14, 1843, and Aug. 6, 1862, enlisted in Co. C, 154th N. Y. Vols. Participating in the battle of Chancellorsville, he was taken prisoner July 1, 1863, at Gettysburg, was confined in Belle Isle and Richmond, and Sept. 10, 1864, was transferred to Florence, S. C. Feb. 18, 1865, he was started for Salisbury, N. C., but upon reaching Wilmington he made his escape on the morning of Feb. 19th, and three days later rejoined the Union army. He was discharged June 23, 1865. May 27, 1867, Mr. WOODARD married Atalia, daughter of Hiram and Harriet C. MORGAN, and resides on the MORGAN homestead. Children: Asa H., Charles., George C., and Floyd.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Franklinville – Chapter XXVIII (28)

Page 673

Surnames: WOODWORTH, CHAMBERLIN

Harvey WOODWORTH, a brother-in-law of Moses CHAMBERLIN, came to Franklinville in 1823 and settled on lot 45. He was the first carpenter in the west part of the town, and was a fine workman. His son Arad, it is said, invented the first brick machine in the United States that worked satisfactorily in making pressed brick. The first trial of his machine was made on Moses CHAMBERLIN 's farm, near the forks of the road. The right to manufacture, use, and sell it was afterward sold in Boston for $100,000
 

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