TOWN OF ELLICOTTVILLE

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES FROM: "HISTORICAL GAZETTEER AND BIOGRAPHICAL MEMORIAL of CATTARAUGUS COUNTY, NY, ed by WILLIAM ADAMS, Published 1893
 
 

Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 582 & 583

Surnames: ALDRICH, WALKER

Thomas R. ALDRICH was born at Quaker Springs, Saratoga county, Oct. 6, 1840. His father removed to Otsego county soon after his birth and died there in Jan., 1844, leaving his wife without means and with four small children. Thomas had a home with a friend and an uncle until he became fourteen, and since then he has provided for his own wants. Aug. 8, 1862, he enlisted in Co. B, 154th N. Y. Vols. May 2, 1863, he received four bulletwounds at the battle of Chancellorsville and was sent to Carver Hospital at Washington, D. C. He rejoined his regiment at Alexandria, Va., Sept. 11, 1863, and left with it on the 26th for Tennessee, taking part in the battle at Wauhatchie on Oct. 28th. He was also at Chattanooga and Mission Ridge, and started with his regiment in the march through Georgia with General Sherman, but was wounded and captured at Rocky Face Ridge, Ga., May 8, 1864. May 12th he was a prisoner in Andersonville; Sept. 7th he was transferred to the prison at Savannah and later to Millen, to Blackshear, Ga., and to Florence, S. C., and escaped Feb. 22, 1865 at Wilmington en route for the rebel prison at Salisbury, N. C., re-entering the Union lines reduced to a mere skeleton. He was sent to Annapolis, was given a furlough, and was honorably discharged June 22, 1865. In Sept., 1865, he was given a position in the quartermaster's department of the 100th U. S. Colored Infantry at Columbia, Tenn., where he remained until the regiment was mustered out Dec, 30, 1865. He returned to Cattaraugus county and is now and has been for fifteen years deputy sheriff, has been postmaster of Ellicottville five years, deputy U. S. marshal eight years, and commander of S. C. Noyes Post, No. 232, G. A. R., and of Maybee Tent, No. 23, K. O. T. M., several years. Feb. 2, 1869, he married Maryette WALKER, who died June 29, 1877.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 583

Surnames: ARNOLD, HADLEY, DEVEREUX, YOUNG, FRAZIER, NEUBACHER, LAWTON

Samuel P. ARNOLD, born in Londonderry, Vt., about 1798, married Betsey HADLEY, and shortly afterward emigrated to Le Roy, N. Y., coming thence in 1827 to Ellicottville, where he conducted a tannery and had an interest in a shoe shop and furniture establishment. He was deputy sheriff nine years and represented Ellicottville on the Board of Supervisors in 1853 and 1854. He was a collector for the Holland Land Company and later for Mr. DEVEREUX. At one time he owned 1,300 acres of land which he stocked with cattle, being also a heavy dealer in cattle and sheep. Mr. ARNOLD was an active, energetic business man and a good companion; he was generous and kind to the poor, but never made any display of his virtues.

E. Young ARNOLD, son of Samuel, was born in Le Roy, N. Y., May 8, 1826. April 12, 1859, he married Laura P. YOUNG, of New Albion, daughter of Hon. Horace C. YOUNG. He has had extensive dealings in cattle in his own county, in Buffalo, and in Canada. Both he and his wife are great readers.

Charles S. ARNOLD, another son of Samuel P. and Betsey E. (HADLEY) ARNOLD, was born in the village of Ellicottville, Feb. 9, 1838. He attended the common schools and was on his father's farm until he was twenty-eight, when he began farming for himself. Besides this he is an extensive dealer in cattle and sheep. In 1859 he married Addie FRAZIER, who bore him one son, Charles E., and one daughter, Nellie (Mrs. Frank NEUBACHER), of Salamanca. Mrs. ARNOLD died Dec. 10, 1874, and Dec. 16, 1875, Mr. ARNOLD married, second, Emma LAWTON.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 583 & 584

Surnames: BALLOU, BARRETT

The BALLOU family in America are of Huguenot descent and early settled in Rhode Island with Roger WILLIAMS's colony. They were lovers of civil liberty, possessed quite a military spirit, and one of the family served in the Revolutionary war.

Charles F. BALLOU, son of David and Eliza (BARRETT) BALLOU, natives of Vermont, was born in East Otto in 1840, and in early life taught district schools. Sept. 17, 1861, he enlisted in Co. I, 44th N. Y. Vols., and at Gettsyburg received a severe gunshot-wound and was discharged from the hospital a cripple Dec. 21, 1863. Returning to his home in Ashford he attempted farming, but was obliged to give it up and entered the New York customs house in the city of New York, becoming finally a grocer in Ellicottville.

H. E. BALLOU, son of David and Eliza (BARRETT) BALLOU, was born in East Otto in 1845, and in 1861 enlisted in Co. A, 100th N. Y. Vols., experiencing all the vicissitudes of his regiment, and escaping with only the loss of a piece of skin from his nose. He had his haversack and canteen shot from his shoulders at the charge on Fort Wagner and the stock from his gun at Fair Oaks; his blouse was several times pierced with bullets. He was discharged a corporal after a service of three Years and four months, being always on duty and never in the hospital. Mr. BALLOU returned home with imperfect eyesight. He is engaged in bee-keeping.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 584

Surnames: BARLOW, BIDEN

Rev. Arthur E. BARLOW, a native of Ireland, was born in 1854 and emigrated to America at the age of seventeen years. He completed his education for the priesthood in Rome, Italy, in 1877, where he was ordained a priest of the Catholic church. He returned to America, was soon assigned to duty in the profession of his choice, and was appointed pastor of the Church of the Most Holy Name of Mary at Ellicottville in 1889. Father BARLOW is distinguished in his denomination as a sound theologian, and by all who hear him as a gentleman of fine attainments. He was succeeded in his pastorate here during the present year by Rev. J. D. BIDEN and transferred to a permanent charge in Hornellsville, N. Y.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 584

Surname: BIRD

Alexander BIRD, born in Montgomery county, July 21, 1842 enlisted in Co. G, 154th N. Y. Vols., Aug. 6, 1862, was promoted to corporal, sergeant, sergeant-major, and first lieutenant, and commanded a company as acting captain during the last nine months of the war. Mr. BIRD fought at Chancellorsville and under General Sherman was in the battles of Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Kingston, Cassville, Pine Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, and Atlanta, marched to the sea, and was engaged at Savannah. He marched through the Carolinas to Raleigh and was present at General Johnston's surrender. He marched to Washington by way of Richmond and was discharged at Elmira, N. Y., June 22, 1865. Being wounded at Rocky Face Ridge he refused to go to the hospital, never asked for nor received a furlough, and was absent from his company only six months on recruiting service by order of the War Department. In this capacity as well as in the "tented field" he was an able and efficient soldier. On his return from the army he was a blacksmith twelve years; since then he has conducted a grocery and a meat market. In the autumn of 1880 he made a tour of all his old battlefields. From the field of Rocky Face Ridge, where he was wounded, he cut a hickory walking-stick and formed a head for it with a grape shot that he picked up on the field of Resaca. Mr. BIRD is a Republican. He had three brothers in the army: William, James, and Alexander. The aggregate number of battles fought by these four brothers was sixty-one and the sum total of service tendered was eleven years and five months.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 584

Surnames: BLACKALL, KELLY

George BLACKALL was born in County Clare, Ireland, and died in this town June 12, 1893, aged 103 years and ten months. He was a Catholic and had lived in Ellicottville thirty-five years. He was the father of eighteen children, five of whom survive him, one of them being the wife of Timothy KELLY.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 584 & 585

Surnames: BOYCE, BACON, GREEN, LAMB

William BOYCE, a native of Massachusetts, married Mary BACON, a native of New England, and in 1830 settled on lot 10 in Ellicottville. He came from Boston and bought his farm of Allen GREEN, who had lived on it a short time and had made a small improvement. Three years after he settled here a kind friend in Massachusetts offered Mr. BOYCE a yoke of oxen if he would go and get them. The present was gladly accepted and he made the entire trip on foot. Mr., BOYCE died in his native town while there on a visit. Benjamin F. BOYCE was supervisor of Ellicottville in 1868, but died between the first and second weeks of the session and Rensselaer LAMB filled the office the remainder of the term.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 585

Surnames: BROWN, BUCHFINK

Frederick BROWN, Sr., born in Wurttemberg, Germany, in 1831, emigrated in 1853 to America, and was seventy-four days crossing the ocean, landing in New York on July 9th and coming at once to Buffalo. In 1856 he married Anna Maria BUCHFINK, a German lady who crossed the Atlantic in the ship with him. In 1863 they settled where they now live. Mr. BROWN began here with sixty-four acres of primeval forest, which he has changed into cultivated fields and added to it by purchase fifty acres. He enlisted in Co. A, 188th N. Y. Regt., and was honorably discharged June 1, 1865. He fought in the battles of Hatcher's Run, Five Forks, and Appomattox Court House, and is now a pensioner and a member of S. C. Noyes Post, G. A. R. He has been assessor six years. Children: Frederick, Jr., Henry J., Anna, Louisa M., and Charles J.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 585

Surnames: BRYANT, STAUNTON, WOODARD, VINING, KINGSLEY, BEEBE, WILLIAMS, FRENCH DROWN, SEARL

Samuel BRYANT, born in Chesterfield, Mass., Oct. 5, 1781, married Anne STAUNTON, who was born in Northampton, Mass., March 10, 1785. They settled on Bryant hill, so named in honor of the BRYANT family, leaving New England with their seven children and household goods loaded in a heavy covered wagon drawn by two pairs of oxen and arriving at their home, a log cabin, about 1821. While on the journey their little son Royal T. fell under the wheels of the wagon and was instantly killed. They brought with their goods half a bushel of apples, carefully saved the seeds, and planted a nursery which produced the trees of his large orchard, and for several other Orchards in the BRYANT neighborhood. Mr. BRYANT resided on the farm, where he first settled until his death April 17, 1853; Mrs. BRYANT died June 29, 1869. Mr. BRYANT was a captain of militia in Massachusetts; he was a prominent citizen in Ellicottville, a member of the Baptist church, and an old line Whig. They had eleven children, those living to maturity being:

Maria BRYANT, born April 9, 1809 married Alonzo WOODARD

Ursula BRYANT, born April 22, 1810, married Jerold VINING, settled in Kalamazoo, Mich., where she died about 1870

Mary Ann BRYANT, born Feb. 20, 1812, married Nathan KINGSLEY, and died in Ellicottville

Samuel A BRYANT, born March 8, 1814, married Rachel BEEBE

Royal T BRYANT, 2d, born May 29, 1823, died on the homestead Sept. 19, 1844

Louisa F. BRYANT, born March 1, 1825, married Cooley WILLIAMS, and died at about twenty years of age

Amanda M. BRYANT, born April 18, 1827, married Alfred FRENCH, and settled in Lake View, Mich.

Hiram BRYANT, born Nov. 27, 1830, succeeded his father on the homestead. He married, Jan. 3, 1855 Jennette H., daughter of Peter DROWN, who died July 31, 1868, being the mother of these children: Eva A., born Oct. 2, 1858, died July 16, 1884; Freddie A. and Eddie A. (twins), born March 16, 1861; and Warren G., born Sept. 20, 1870. Freddie A. died Oct. 4, 1872. Sept. 20, 1870, Mr. BRYANT married, second, Electa M. SEARL, of Franklinville, who is the mother of two daughters: Bertha L., born Dec. 11, 1874, and Ida J., born Dec, 28, 1 881. Mr. BRYANT is a prominent citizen and a Republican. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 585 & 586

Surnames: CASE

Charles A. CASE, son of Thomas, was born in Lyndon, Oct. 25, 1851, was educated in school district No. 7 of his native town, at Franklinville Academy, and in a commercial college in Buffalo. Remaining with his father, a farmer, and assisting in his large business as a dealer in farmers' produce, He began business himself in dealing in livestock, having a large trade in Canada and the west. He subsequently engaged in life insurance business about two years, when the Bank of Ellicottville was organized and Mr. CASE became its first cashier, a position he has continuously held. Mr. CASE is a prominent citizen, an affable gentleman, a thorough business man, and a true friend.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 586 & 587

Surnames: CLARKE, THAYER

Hon. Staley N. CLARKE – Every epoch of a nation's life produces certain individuals who, by virtue of innate strength of mind and breadth of character, stand above the level of common men, and by them are honored and followed as their benefactors and leaders. It is not in the higher walks of life alone that such men appear; they stand forth in the by-ways to assist and cheer the toils of their fellows by their example and advice. Often in the settlement and development of this country such leaders of men have come opportunely to guide the well-being of some struggling colony, and by their purity of life, honesty of purpose, and conscientiousness in the discharge of duty have contributed to the happiness and promoted the welfare of all with broad and generous sympathy. Identified with the early history and development of the county was Hon. Staley Nichols CLARKE. Mr. CLARKE was born in Prince George county, Md., May 24, 1794. At about the age of twenty-one he settled at Buffalo, N. Y., and began his career as a clerk in the Bank of Niagara. In 1819 he was offered and accepted a clerkship in the office of the Holland Land Company at Batavia, N. Y., where he remained until Jan., 1822, when he was transferred to the office of the company at Ellicottville and appointed as their authorized agent for the county of Cattaraugus. In this selection of manager the company chose wisely. His previous service in the office at Batavia had shown that he possessed the qualities requisite to success in the new field to which they desired to send him, and they were quick to discern and prompt in availing themselves of the benefit they would derive from his business capacity. The result amply justified the trust they reposed in him, and Mr. CLARKE remained the agent of the company until it sold out to the Farmers' Loan and Trust Company.

The country was rugged and uninviting and then but sparsely settled. Communication between the different settlements, widely separated by unbroken forests, was slow and difficult, and the settlers at first came but little under the charm of the agent's presence, and hence intimate acquaintanceship was of slow growth. Those who came to take up the land were, in the main, without capital or resource, except brave hearts and brawny arms, with will as sturdy and purpose as rugged as the surrounding forests and hillsides. The instinct of self-preservation inspired them to constant watchfulness lest in some way they should be deceived or imposed upon. They knew their weakness, and for a time they feared the power of the agent. Better acquaintance, however, disarmed suspicion and revealed to them the true excellence of his character; they came to know him as he was and trusted and respected him. The settlers came to him for advice and counsel in all the simple affairs of their uneventful lives, and his relations with them soon became paternal. They confided in and trusted him to a degree quite wonderful, and consistent only with, the fact that they had discovered his merit and read aright his character. Without judicial authority Mr. CLARKE was for many years the people's chancellor. To him they came as to an upright judge with their disputes and their contentions. He listened to their recitals, and his intuitive perception of right and wrong enabled him, to see where justice lay; and so great was their confidence in his wisdom and integrity that his decisions were always respected. Men left his presence with the conviction strong upon them that if they pursued the course suggested by him they could not go far wrong.

His position as between the settlers and the company, whose representative he was, must have been at times a delicate one, not wholly free from embarrassment, and yet, through it all, there was never once the slightest intimation or suspicion of injustice to the one or lack of fidelity to the other. It is believed that in no case was a settler, if worthy and meritorious, evicted from the land for which he held a contract because of inability to meet promptly his payments. If to those who held the security further indulgence seemed beyond the limit of business prudence, and foreclosure became imminent, Mr. CLARKE often made the obligation his own, paid the debt to the company, assumed the risk, and carried the burden, thus insuring the settler against oppression and the company against loss; and so at once was generous to the one and just to the other. In later years, when the condition of the settlers had improved and the gloomy forest had become productive farms; when poverty had given way to modest competence, and to the scant and coarse necessities of life had been added many of its comforts and some of its luxuries; when hard and unremitting toil had been succeeded by some degree of leisure and the pioneers had become independent, self-supporting citizens, they did not forget their friend and benefactor; they were wont to dwell with a fondness amounting almost to devotion upon the unselfish, disinterested, and immeasurable service he had rendered them. They told their children the story of his life, and his name became a household word and his memory a benediction.

Not only by those whom he had befriended was he honored; he was respected and beloved by all men, the affluent, the learned, and the influential. To the needy, if deserving, he was an unfailing friend; no worthy person in distress ever appealed to him for aid and was sent away empty handed. Benevolent far beyond the common, his charities were not bestowed with ostentation or desire for notoriety, but with unobtrusive modesty in harmony with the simple grandeur of his nature. In short his character was ennobled by the unity and harmonious blending of more good qualities and marred by fewer faults than is usual with men who are esteemed both good and great. He was of stately figure and commanding presence, and his manner was one in which were combined both simplicity and elegance. Though not indifferent to public affairs he was not in the popular sense ambitious to appear in them. He served his county as treasurer for seventeen years, and at the earnest desire of his friends consented to represent the district in the Twenty-seventh Congress. On the expiration of his term he declined a re-election. On Oct. 27, 1816, he married Eunice THAYER, of Ontario county, N. Y., who was born March 5, 1797, and died at Corry, Pa., June 23, 1873. Mr. CLARKE at Ellicottville, Oct. 14, 1860.

Ed. Note: This biography includes a photograph of Staley N. CLARKE

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 587 & 588

Surnames: CLARK, STEWART

William CLARK, son of Wells CLARK, was born in Granville, Aug. 28, 1814, and reared in Blandford, Mass. He married Caroline M. STEWART, of Canton, Conn., a native of Blandford, Mass., Aug. 20, 1839, and the ensuing spring emigrated to Ellicottville, coming by canal from Albany to Buffalo, thence with a team to this town, arriving May 1, 1840. His farm had some twenty-five acres partly cleared and a small frame barn, but no house. While building a portion of the house he now occupies, they resided in a deserted old log house nearby; here the little striped snakes were in possession and would frequently bob up their heads through the large cracks in the floor. Mr. CLARK had means to pay for his original farm of 122 acres, and has added to it from time to time until he now has nearly 300 acres. His children are: George and Harlan M. CLARK, farmers on the homestead

Charles W. CLARK, who occupies his father's farm in Mansfield

James O. CLARK, a lawyer and teller of the Bank of Ellicottville

Wells W. CLARK, a mechanic and farmer in Ellicottville

Carrie L. CLARK, at home

Mary CLARK, who died in Sept., 1889, aged twenty-nine. 

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 588

Surnames: COIT, HARRIS, HUNTLEY, CLARKE, SHULTS

Lewis COIT, son of Roger and Hannah (HARRIS) COIT, was born in Norwich, Mass., June 18, 1818. His parents came to Ellicottville in March, 1820. Their conveyance was a heavy sled drawn by a pair of oxen; their first residence, a log cabin, stood on the site of Judge Scott's barn. Two or three years later he built the residence occupied by the late Amy HUNTLEY. In 1827 Mr. COIT removed to the COIT homestead, the home of Lewis COIT, where he had cleared twenty acres and built a log house, and where he died Dec. 14, 1829. Lewis COIT and his younger brother William then had the labor of the farm and the care of their mother and her seven children. They cut wood three feet long and drew it to Hon. Staley N. CLARKE (the only one who would buy it at any price) and sold it for fifty cents per cord. They saved the ashes in their fields and from the kitchen fire, leached them, and made black-salts. Their industrious mother spun and wove linen and wool and clad her family, and often wove cloth for her neighbors. They rode to church in summer in a lumber wagon drawn by oxen an in winter on a sled. Lewis COIT has twelve children living. His mother died at the age of sixty-seven years. In 1847 he married Maria SHULTS. He has been a dealer in working oxen.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 588

Surnames: COLMAN, BEECHER

Truman Rowley COLMAN was born in Coventry, Conn., Nov. 13, 1809, and was a resident of Ellicottville from 1829 until 1854. He was prominently identified with the land interests in Cattaraugus, Allegany, and Wyoming counties and besides carried on at times an extensive mercantile trade and banking business. In 1854 he removed to Dunkirk, N. Y., where he established what became the Lake Shore National Bank. He married Sophia M., a daughter of Moses BEECHER. She died Sept. 30, 1867.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 588 & 589

Surnames: COTTER, RICE, JOHNSON, HACKETT

James COTTER, born in County Cork, Ireland, Oct. 31, 1831, received a good business education, and at the age of seventeen years, with his father, William, and brother Richard, emigrated to America in a sailing vessel and landed at Quebec after a voyage of six weeks and three days. In 1852 they all settled in Ellicottville. James COTTER, in May, 1858, invested what he had saved in a grocery store, which he continued until 1880, since which time he has lived a retired life. Mr. COTTER has always been a fair dealer. He is a liberal Democrat and during the late war he gave his aid and influence to the Union. He is a great reader. In religion he is a Catholic. Feb. 23, 1864, he was elected town collector of taxes; March 26, 1864, Addison G. RICE, Samuel William JOHNSON, and James COTTER were appointed a committee on the part of the town of Ellicottville to procure the number of men to fill the quota, and were allowed to pay bounties in their discretion, but in the aggregate not to exceed $4,800; Feb. 27, 1866, he was again elected collector; in 1872 he was a delegate to the Democratic State convention at Rochester and the same fall he was a delegate to the Democratic national convention at Baltimore, which nominated Horace Greeley for the presidency: he is now serving a three years’ term as assessor. Oct. 27, 1858, he married Honora H. HACKETT, a native of County Tipperary, Ireland, who was born Dec. 10, 1835, and came to Ellicottville in 1852. They have been members of the choir of the Catholic church about thirty years and Mrs. COTTER has been organist the last twelve years.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 589

Surnames: CRAWFORD, FULLER

Burt J. CRAWFORD was born in Napoli in 1861, was reared in Java, Wyoming county, and married Minerva FULLER, of Arcade, N. Y. For two years he kept hotel in Springville, N. Y., and in Nov., 1882, purchased the CRAWFORD House in Ellicottville, which was burned May 11, 1890. He immediately rebuilt a fine brick hotel, which was conceded to be one of the handsomest structures and the best appointed hostelries in Cattaraugus county. This property he exchanged in February, 1893, for property in Buffalo, where he is now proprietor of the newly refitted Hotel Carlton on Exchange street.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 589

Surnames: DAVIS, EDDY

William H. DAVIS, son of John H. and Almira DAVIS, was born in Montgomery county April 5, 1840. In 1845 the family removed to Ellicottville and located where William H. DAVIS now lives. Feb. 6, 1862, he enlisted in Co. C, 105th N. Y. Vols., reached Washington on April 8th, and the first night there slept on the ground, which during the night was covered with snow six inches deep. He was attacked with measles on the 10th and sent to the hospital, where he was confined three weeks, when he rejoined his regiment at Cloud's Mills, Va. From the effects of the measles he was again ill and confined in the hospital about two months. He participated in the battle of Cedar Mountain, Aug. 9, 1862, was in the battles of Warrenton Junction, Thoroughfare Gap, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Mine Run, and Cold Harbor, where he received a wound from a minie-ball which fractured his skull above the left eye and shattered his cheek bone, which has never united. From blood-poisoning from this wound he has totally lost his left lung. From the time he received the wound until July, 1865, he was confined in the hospital and was then mustered out with his regiment. He has been an invalid ever since. March 26, 1871 he married Lucy EDDY. Children: Emma O., Clara, William H., and Mildred.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 589 & 590

Surnames: DROWN, GREEN, THAYER, BURLINGAME, HUFF, HUENERFELD, WALKER, BATTS, DAY

Peter DROWN, a native of Hartford, Conn., married Eliza GREEN and soon after removed to New York State. He was employed as a sentinel at the prison in Auburn about two years; settled on a farm in Sweden, N. Y., and marketed his wheat in Rochester for twenty-five cents per bushel; and about 1827 began anew in the woods in the northwest part of Ellicottville, where he cleared the land and gave all his family a good education. Mr. DROWN served as commissioner of highways. His wife died in 1821 and left five children; his second wife, Sarepta THAYER, bore him nine children. Ten children are living; two reside in Ellicottville. Mr. DROWN died March 11, 1875, aged eighty-three years.

Elbridge DROWN, the youngest by the first wife, was born Nov. 5, 1819, began life as a jobber clearing land and taught school nine winter terms. He has been a farmer, and also a dealer in real estate and cattle. He married Frances, granddaughter of Rickertson BURLINGAME.

Oliver T. DROWN, son of Peter and Sarepta (THAYER) DROWN, was born in Monroe county Aug, 1, 1824, and about 1854 he removed to Spartansburg, Pa., where he engaged in mercantile business. In 1865 he came to Ellicottville and opened a general store, which he conducted until his decease in 1870. Sept. 3, 1849, he married Harriet, daughter of Jacob HUFF, of East Otto, and they had four children, the oldest, Herman B. DROWN, being the only survivor. He was born in Ellicottville in 1850 and commenced his business life as a druggist in Spartansburg, Pa., in 1876. In 1878 he returned to his native town, where he has since conducted a drug store. In 1876 Mr. DROWN married Louise HUENERFELD of Ellicottville. They have one son.

Alfonso DROWN, youngest child of Peter, was born on the DROWN homestead, where he now resides, Jan 10, 1842. He received a good English education, and married Nancy, daughter of Collins and Amanda (WALKER) BATTS, of New Albion. Mr. DROWN has been an elder of the First Presbyterian church of Ellicottville for many years.

Peter M. DROWN, son of Elbridge, born Jan. 22, 1854, received a good English education, and Oct. 11, 1879, married Flora DAY. He settled on Bryant hill, where, when he took possession in 1872, his crop of hay was only eight tons; he has so improved his farm that in 1890 he harvested about 160 tons. Mr. DROWN is a progressive farmer and gives his influence for the cause of temperance. Both are members of the Presbyterian church. Meetings of Bryant Hill Lodge, No. 808, I. O. G. T., are held at his house. Of this body he was its first chief templar.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 590

Surnames: GRAY, ROMYEN

Andrew GRAY was born in Northumberland county, England, in 1790 and with his parents came to America in 1800, settling in Gorham, Ontario county, where they lived ten years. His father then purchased a tract of 500 acres of wild land in Caledonia, Livingston county, removed to it, and there the parents died. Andrew had 100 acres of this purchase. He married Agnes ROMYEN, Feb. 21, 1821, and in 1832 removed his family to a farm in the southeast part of Mansfield, where he died March 22, 1864, and his wife Nov. 27, 1879. Mr. GRAY was a soldier in the War of 1812. They had five children.

Their oldest son, George GRAY, born in Caledonia, July 16, 1823, received an academic education, was a farmer, was nine years supervisor of Mansfield, and was many years a member of the Board of Trustees and a generous supporter of the Presbyterian church of Ellicottville. He gave his influence to every good and noble object and died Oct. 28, 1874.

His brother, Abram GRAY, was born in Caledonia, July 7, 1826. He supplemented his common school education with a year's attendance at an academy, remained with his parents until twenty-three years of age, and began business for himself as a carpenter and builder, which has since been his avocation. Many fine residences, among others St. Bonaventure's College at Allegany and the wooden bridge spanning the Allegheny river in South Valley, are monuments to his skill. Mr. GRAY has resided in the village since 1873. He has been an elder of the Presbyterian church for twenty-one years and trustee twenty years.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 590

Surnames: GREEN, PUTNAM

Allen GREEN removed from Cazenovia, N. Y., to Sardinia, Erie county, in 1815. In 1826 he came to the northeast corner of Ellicottville, where he purchased 317 acres of wild land, and where his nearest neighbor was five miles distant. He died Sept. 13, 1859, and his wife, Mercy PUTNAM, May 5, 1872. Children: Charles, Job, Betsey, Clarinda, Obadiah, Allen M., Perry, Ellen, Sarah, Mary, and Job, 2d. Allen M. GREEN resides in Franklinville. Obadiah GREEN lived in Sardinia and became a prominent citizen.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 590

Surnames: GRINOLS, TRIPP, HINMAN

Harvey GRINOLS, son of Daniel R. and Elsie (TRIPP) GRINOLS, was born in Otto, Sept. 23, 1839, and Sept. 23, 1861, enlisted in Co. B, 9th N. Y. Cav., and was on duty with his regiment until he was attacked with fever and obliged to go to the hospital. He was transferred in an emaciated condition to Block Island Hospital, near Providence, R. I., from which he was. discharged Oct. 28, 1862. He returned to his farm with ruined health and was obliged to give up so laborious an occupation, and now resides in the village, where he is engaged in dealing in light produce. Jan. 15, 1865, he married Lorincla HINMAN, of East Otto, and they have two sons and two daughters.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 591

Surnames: HARRINGTON, AIKEN, BEECHER

Joseph, Owen, Miles, and Caleb HARRINGTON, sons of Nathaniel HARRINGTON, came from Otsego county and settled in Mansfield in 1826. The father had served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war and was a pensioner. He was a well-to-do farmer in Otsego county and gave each of his sons a yoke of oxen and fifty acres of land in Mansfield. They soon disposed of their farms. Joseph and Miles settled in Ellicottville, Owen went to Ohio, and Joseph and Caleb eventually located in Little Valley.

Miles HARRINGTON married Sarah, daughter of Benjamin AIKEN. Their children were Henry W., Stephen A., Augustus C., and Sally D. 

Stephen A. HARRINGTON, born on Fish hill in Mansfield, July 8, 1828, was early obliged to leave school, and finally entered the law office of his brother, where he was two or three years, leaving by the advice of his physician. He was a groceryman in Ellicottville most of his life, was an aggressive politician and a life-long Democrat, and sometimes in the heat of political campaigns he had a little trouble. He believed in the principles of the Democracy as opposed to those of the Whig party, and was an influential leader. He held several town offices, being justice of the peace nearly thirty years. He was a keeper in the Auburn prison until he resigned the position; he also did some conveyancing and pettifogging in justice's court. He married Adaline BEECHER, niece of Moses BEECHER, of Ellicottville, and their children were Walter A. and Fred L.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 591

Surnames: HILER, LANCHOW, FOX, STADLER, KING

John HILLER, born near Hamburg, Germany, about 1831, married Mary LANCHOW, and in 1863 emigrated with his wife and three children to America, coming to Cattaraugus county and settling in East Otto. He was a brickmaker in his native country, but gave his attention to farming after locating here. He died in Ashford in 1868. His widow married William FOX, Sr., a native of Germany and a farmer. Mr. HILLER's children were Sophia (Mrs. A. STADLER); Henry J., who married Mary KING and resides in Plato; and Herman F., a general merchant and an extensive dealer in farm produce. Mr. HILLER commenced his mercantile life a clerk at $12 per month and boarded himself. Three years later he began business where he had been a clerk.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 591

Surnames: HORNUNG, WEIDMANN, BUSCKRIST

Joseph HORNING was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, in 1844. In 1871 He married Louise WEIDMANN and came to America. Being a carriage maker he prosecuted his trade successively in Little Valley and Ellicottville, and in the spring of 1880 settled on the farm near Ashford Junction where he now resides. Mr. HORNING is also a dealer in agricultural implements and fertilizers. His wife died in 1872 and in 1874 he married Henrietta BUSCKRIST, who is the mother of all his living children.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 591 & 592

Surnames: HUNTLEY, STILLWELL, McGOWEN, HAWKINS, CHAMBERLAIN

Daniel HUNTLEY, a native of Connecticut, married Catherine, daughter of Thomas STILLWELL, and in 1817 removed from Cortland county to Franklinville with his family. It appears that he possessed considerable means, for he bought a large tract of land sufficiently cleared to support thirty cows, which he drove to his place when he came, and began farming on a large scale for that day. His was probably the first dairy in Cattaraugus county. When the county seat was located in Ellicottville he purchased the eighty-acre farm new occupied by his grandson, William HUNTLEY, and moved onto it; he subsequently increased his real estate to about 900 acres. In 1820 he built the Cattaraugus Mansion House and opened it to the public the ensuing year, and kept it until he died July 5, 1846. The hotel was continued by his family until 1872. Mrs. HUNTLEY survived until Dec. 7, 1864. Their children were: William, who died in 1828, and was the first person in Ellicottville who was buried with Masonic honors; Thomas S., a farmer at Huntley Station, Ill., the location being named in his honor; Daniel I.; Silas; Samuel; Amy; Catharine, who died in 1827; and Jane M. (Mrs. P. J. McGOWEN)

Daniel I. HUNTLEY, born in Cortland county, Sept. 5, 1810, married, in 1840, Eliza HAWKINS, a native of Massachusetts who died in April, 1852, and Jan. 2, 1855, he married, second, Cordelia CHAMBERLAIN, who was also born in Massachusetts. Mr. HUNTLEY was with his father assisting on the farm and in the hotel. After the sale of the latter he devoted his time and attention to agriculture. He was prominently interested in military affairs and held all the grades successively from second sergeant to brigadier-general of the militia of the State. He also held the office of county treasurer three years from 1843 and several minor civil positions. He was supervisor of Mansfield in 1862 and 1863.

Thomas S. HUNTLEY held the same office in Ellicottville in 1840, while Horace S. HUNTLEY served the town of Little Valley in this capacity in 1856, '62, and '66.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 592

Surnames: HURLBURT, BURLINGAME, NILES

Grove HURLBURT, the first settler in the town of Ellicottville, was born in Tolland, Conn., in 1765, and was an early settler in Whitestown, Oneida county. He next built and conducted a tavern at Oriskany and in 1809 settled on a farm of "lease lands" in the town of Rome. In 1815, after a journey of six weeks, he came upon Rickertson BURLINGAME, who was surveying this town into lots, and, being pleased with the location, went a few weeks later to the land office in Batavia and was offered inducements to settle as soon as the town was surveyed. In the ensuing fall he came with his son John and made choice of lots 56 and 57, containing 316 acres. They remained till fall and cut up the timber preparatory to clearing seven acres, and built a log house, the first habitation of white people in Ellicottville. Feb. 11, 1816 Grove HURLBURT's brother Reuben, with Grove's son and daughter John and Sally, arrived at this log cabin; the latter, then but eleven years old, became the temporary female head of the HURLBURT family, which honors she discharged until March 15th when they were joined by her parents and the remainder of the family. Here Mr. HURLBURT spent the residue of his long life, dying Sept. 28, 1852. Mr. HURLBURT brought provisions, as he supposed, sufficient to last until he could raise and harvest a crop. The frosts of the "cold season" of' 1816 destroyed his grain and corn and he had only a small crop of potatoes. The next season he made black-salts, which he exchanged for two barrels of flour at $18 per barrel. To carry the family through to wheat harvest John searched the country for five days to obtain one and one-half bushels of corn, which he purchased at $1.50 a bushel. Mr. HURLBURT planted the first orchard in town in the spring of 1816. They were obliged to go thirteen miles to mill and to Bethany and Le Roy in Genesee county for groceries. Bears and wolves preyed upon their sheep. John was taught by a hunter to trap the wolves and caught six in a winter, for which he received a bounty of $60 per head. Mr. HURLBURT erected the first frame barn in town in the fall of 1816 and built a comfortable frame house in 1822, now well preserved and occupied. He married Hannah NILES, of Whitestown, a native of Vermont, who was the mother of his thirteen children. Their seven sons are deceased.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 592 & 593

Surnames: JOHNSTON, HURLBURT

William JOHNSTON, a pioneer of Ellicottville, was born in Johnstown, N. Y., which place was named in honor of one of his ancestors. June 21, 1822, he married Sally, daughter of Grove HURLBURT. She was born in Whitestown, N. Y., Feb. 14, 1803. They first settled on a farm, but in November, 1826, removed to the village, where Mrs. JOHNSTON still resides. Mr. JOHNSTON was a skillful mechanic and conducted a cabinet shop. He was a man of influence in town and church affairs, was a justice of the peace, and held other town offices, and was a vestryman in the Episcopal church. Mr. JOHNSTON died in June, 1853. Children of William and Sally JOHNSTON: John, a physician of Jackson, Mich.; Grove, deceased; Byron A.; William H.; and Mary, deceased

William H. JOHNSTON, born Sept. 21, 1832, enlisted in August, 1862, in the 154th N. Y. Vols. as a musician and was honorably discharged from Mt. Pleasant hospital in February, 1863. He is now a dentist in the village.

Capt. Byron A. JOHNSTON, was born in Ellicottville, Jan. 31, 1827. In 1852 he went overland to California. He remained and two and a half years later returned by way of the isthmus. He was wrecked with 1,500 passengers on board the steamer Yankee Blade, off Point Conception, and over 100 passengers were lost. He was a carpenter by trade. May. 7, 1861, he enlisted for two years in Co. H, 37th N. Y. Vols., and served as orderly-sergeant. He was discharged at Fort Washington, Md., Jan. 19, 1862, on a surgeon's certificate of disability. July 21, 1862, he re-enlisted in Co. A, 154th N. Y. Vols., for three years, as orderly sergeant. Oct. 6, 1862, be was promoted as second lieutenant, May 1, 1863, as first lieutenant, and July 9, 1864, as captain. He participated in the first battle of Bull Run. With the 154th Regiment he was in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. With the Eleventh Army Corps he was transferred to the Army of the Cumberland on Sept. 28, 1863, and participated at Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. He went with his regiment to the relief of General Burnside at Knoxville, Tenn., and returned to Lookout Valley in December, 1863, where his command spent the winter. In May, 1864, his regiment joined General Sherman and marched from Chattanooga to Atlanta. He continued with Sherman from Atlanta to the sea and from Savannah to Washington, and was mustered out in June, 1865.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 593

Surnames: KING, COOK, MUNGER, GAYLORD, MATTESON

Alanson KING, son of Arnold and Candace (COOK) KING, was born in Collins, Erie county, March 20, 1816, and married Charlotte MUNGER in Hanover, Chautauqua county, Jan. 12, 1843. He early became a major of militia, and in 1848 removed to Ashford, where he engaged in mercantile business and owned and conducted a flouring-mill and saw-mill. In 1849 he represented Ashford on the Board of Supervisors. He was an old line Whig, but on the organization of the Republican party joined its ranks. In 1856 he was elected a member of Assembly. He went to the Legislature for honest work and ably filled the position and the expectations of his constituents. Gen. Samuel W. Johnson, a Democrat, said of him: "He returned from the Legislature as poor as he entered it." Mr. KING was man of more than average ability; he had great influence, and his integrity and honesty were unquestioned. In 1861 he received an appointment in the customs house in New York, where he remained until 1871. He resided in Ellicottville the ensuing two years and died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Candace M. GAYLORD, in Tiona, Pa., Aug. 10, 1888, and was buried at Ashford with Masonic honors. His son, Edwin S., the only member of the family residing in Cattaraugus county, was born in Collins, N. Y., Feb. 8, 1844. At the age of fifteen he commenced teaching district schools and taught three winter terms. In Feb., 1862, he came to Ellicottville, and in 1872 formed a partnership in the drug business with Charles H. MATTESON, whose interest he subsequently purchased. Mr. KING was assistant assessor of internal revenue about ten months; after that office was abolished he was appointed deputy collector, holding the position in all eight years. He has been secretary of the Republican County Committee and clerk of the Board of Supervisors.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 593 & 594

Surnames: LANGHANS, MEROW, BLOCK, EULERS

John LANGHANS, born in Lauenburg, Germany, Nov. 4, 1811, married Dora MEROW in Oct., 1841, and came to America in 1858, settling first in East Otto, where he and his family saved money to make a payment on one hundred acres of land on Jackman hill in Ellicottville, where his son John now lives. He removed to this farm in the fall of 1861 and died there Sept. 21, 1884. John LANGHANS, Jr., was born in Germany, Oct. 21, 1843, came to America with his parents, and Sept. 9, 1864, enlisted in Co. H, 154th N. Y. Vols., joining the regiment at Chattanooga, Tenn. He marched through Georgia in General Sherman's campaign and was honorably discharged with the rank of corporal at the close of the war. Since then Mr. LANGHANS has been a farmer. He is a Republican and has served his town as assessor. Oct. 21, 1868, he married Sophia BLOCK and has three children. Henry LANGHANS married Dora EULERS, resides on a portion of the old homestead, and has three children. Julius LANGHANS, son of John, Sr., is a farmer in Mansfield.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 594

Surnames: LAWLER, STACK, SHANKLAND

William LAWLER was born in the Parish of Kilconley, Ireland, about 1820, came to America in 1852, and was married in Buffalo, in 1854, to Jane H. STACK, a native of Ballylongford, Ireland. They settled the same spring in Peth in Great Valley. In March, 1873, they located on the farm at Ashford Junction where they still reside. They have five children living: Garrat T., William J., Eugene M., James E., and Charles A. Eugene M. LAWLER was born Jan. 23, 1862, received his education in the common schools and at the Union school at Ellicottville, chose the printer's trade, and at the age of fourteen years entered the office of Hon. Robert H. SHANKLAND, where he spent four years. In 1881 he opened a general store at Ashford Junction.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 594 - 596

Surnames: LITCHFIELD, HAYDEN, DOOLY, BROWN, BUCK, THATCHER, FRENCH, BOYCE

Beals E. LITCHFIELD, youngest son and child of Ensign and Mary (HAYDEN) LITCHFIELD, was born in Chesterfield, Hampshire county, Mass., Dec. 12, 1823. His ancestors were of English descent. At the age of scarcely seven years he came to the settlement of Ellicottville, where the blows of the pioneer's axe were resounding and the primeval forest yet standing, although it had been fourteen years since the birth of the first white child. He describes the arrival, etc., thus: "In the month of October, 1830, Ensign LITCHFIELD and Mary, his wife, then residing in the town of Chesterfield, Hampshire county, Mass., and who were the parents of eleven children, of whom the writer is the youngest, loaded their seven youngest children into a covered wagon drawn by two horses, and bidding farewell to their native hills and home (where for many years they had struggled with adversity, though sometimes they rejoiced in prosperity) started to seek a new home in the then wild woods of Cattaraugus county, N. Y. After a tedious journey of two weeks the covered wagon with its load of emigrants arrived at a log tavern kept by Freeman Bryant, located in the town of Ellicottville on what has since been known as Bryant hill, and on the same place where Peter Drown's dwelling house now stands. Through the kindness of Mr. Bryant and his estimable companion, who had been old acquaintances of the emigrants in the east, the tired and hungry travelers were supplied with a bountiful dinner, to which they did ample justice. After the repast the team was hitched to the wagon and wended its way slowly over the roots and through the woods for about a mile and a half to where our oldest brother Simeon had a few months before pitched, not his tent like the wanderers of old, but his shanty in the woods, said shanty being built of logs and covered with basswood troughs. The floor was also made of basswood split open in the center and laid the flat side up. The fire for warming and cooking purposes was built in one corner upon the ground, without hearth or chimney. There was an open space in the roof above the fire for the smoke to pass out, but when the wind blew much of the smoke returned to bid the inmates of the shanty a "good bye," and that "good-bye" blessing often caused the silent tear to fall and invariably left a smarting sting behind. This shanty was located on what is now known as the DOOLY farm At that time brother Simeon's family consisted of himself, wife, and three children and father's family of nine persons, and these fourteen people lived in that little shanty (the size of which was only twelve by sixteen feet) for four weeks, until brother Elisha, who was about twenty-one years of age, bought of Orrin BROWN his chance on seventy-eight acres of land on lot 62, on which we now reside, and is a part of the LITCHFIELD farm which at present contains three hundred acres. Not being able to obtain possession of the log house on the premises until the next spring, they built a "lean-to" against the back side of the log house, and there our father's family lived during the winter of 1830-31. Such were the conditions we met on our first introduction to Cattaraugus county. There were only a few acres cleared on the farm bought by father, and he and brother Elisha worked on that land the next summer. In October, 1831, Elisha married Amy BUCK and in December his spirit left the material form and passed on to a higher condition of life in the spirit realms of existence. Our father, Ensign LITCHFIELD, faithfully labored on the farm as a pioneer for ten years, and October 17, 1840, quietly passed to the higher life, sincerely mourned and sadly missed by his many relatives and friends. Our mother remained with us until May, 1858, when she was released from her material form and crossed the mystic river to join those who were waiting her on the other side. She was truly loved by all her children and friends and was much missed."

As Beals LITCHFIELD grew in strength and years he assisted in the great work of transforming the forests into fruitful fields, became an agriculturist, and has ever been a careful and successful one. He loved and honored his vocation, and his opinions on agriculture are worthy of record. He says: "During the last quarter of a century I have noticed that many young men have left the farm and engaged in other occupations, either because they considered that of agriculture less dignified or less lucrative. There undoubtedly are other occupations or speculations in which, if successful, a large fortune can be more speedily accumulated than by agriculture, but I am sure that the different branches of agricultural pursuits contain all the elements and conditions necessary to bring wealth and happiness to those farmers who pursue their labors in a reasonable and scientific manner. Agriculture is the basis of all other pursuits, hence it can not be less dignified or less useful to mankind. In an early period it was supposed by many that a farmer did not need much education, that a half-idiot could plow, sow, reap, and mow, and consequently be a successful farmer, but opinions as well as agricultural implements have changed, and it is now admitted by well informed farmers that a scientific education is necessary for success in agriculture. A scientific application of labor and other means often unlocks nature's storehouse and fills the farmer's barn with the rich fruitage of the soil and his heart with joy, and I here affirm that agriculture is a chemical science and. one of the most useful ever revealed by the Creator to mankind."*

Mr. LITCHFIELD is modest and unassuming in his manners and honest in his convictions. For forty years he has been a believer in Spiritualism, was one of its pioneer speakers, and with conscientious endeavor he lives up to the truths of his belief. In 1890 he published a book, "Leaflets of Thought gathered from the Tree of Life," and has another volume (his autobiography) ready for publication. He has passed a quiet and uneventful life of three-score years and more on the beautiful place where his father first settled; here he brought his worthy helpmeet, Lucinda, daughter of Israel and Delight THATCHER, of Hopewell, Ontario county, whom he married October 14, 1847. Here they have dispensed a generous hospitality; here they have experienced many joys and many sorrows; here their children were born, and here they have mourned their departure for the spirit world; and from here after long and useful lives may they cross to the beautiful land beyond, and "meet their Pilot face to face."

Levi LITCHFIELD, son of Ensign, was born in Massachusetts in 1805 and married Nancy FRENCH. In the spring of 1831 he settled in the north part of Ellicottville and in 1835 or '36 made a permanent home on the farm now owned by Fred Weishan. He cleared this farm, erected good buildings, aided in building school houses, and gave all his children a substantial education. During the Rebellion he sold his farm and retired to the village, where he died in June, 1887. Like most of the pioneers he worked hard, was a good financier, accumulated a fair fortune for a farmer, and was highly respected. His oldest son, Harvey LITCHFIELD, was born in Massachusetts in September, 1826, was educated in the common schools, and early chopped, rolled logs, made black-salts, and at the age of twenty-six had 100 acres of his father's farm. He married Almira BOYCE. He inherited his father's sterling qualities.

Ed. Note: This biography includes a photograph of Beals E. LITCHFIELD

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 596

Surnames: LOWE, BUGBY, PITCHER, CHAMBERLAIN, BARTLETT, WARD

Andrew LOWE came to Ellicottville from Albany, where he had been a dry goods clerk six years. In 1837 he married Jane BUGBY, who came to this town when only five years old and resided in the family of Spencer PITCHER. Mr. LOWE died in 1841, aged twenty-seven years; Mrs. LOWE died in July, 1887, aged sixty-seven. She was the widow of Moses CHAMBERLAIN, who died in Feb., 1864.

Theodore LOWE, son of Andrew, was born Sept. 8, 1839. From 1859 to 1866 he was in the employ of Daniel BARTLETT, who ran a stage line from Ellicottville to Great Valley, which he extended to Salamanca in 1864. In March, 1866, Mr. LOWE purchased the route and equipments and conducted the business until the completion of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg railroad in 1878. Since then he has dealt in agricultural implements. He cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln in 1860 has been highway commissioner, and has been for twenty-seven years a Mason. Sept. 7, 1862, he married Celia WARD, of Great Valley.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 596

Surnames: MABEE, COIT, CLARK

Abram MABEE was born in Canajoharie, N. Y., July 4, 1839. His father was born a slave, but was liberated in early life; he resided in Syracuse at the time of the "Jerry rescue," and was so active in that memorable event that he removed to Canada to escape arrest as a rioter. Abram MABEE came to Ellicottville in 1850 and had a home in the family of Lewis COIT until he was twenty-one. In 1861 he went south as a servant of Captain CLARK and soon after was a teamster in the U. S. service. In December, 1864, he enlisted in Co. A, 20th U. S. Col. Inf., and went with his regiment to New Orleans, being promoted to the rank of orderly-sergeant. He was at the siege of Port Hudson, Brownville, Texas, and Mansfield on the Red river, where he was shot in his right thigh, going thence to the hospital, whence he soon rejoined his regiment at Welkin's Bend on the Mississippi river. He was again sent to the hospital at New Orleans, and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. Since then he has been a barber in Ellicottville.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 596 & 597

Surnames: McCOY, BEACH

Bethuel McCOY, son of John and Hannah (BEACH) McCOY, was born in New Jersey in 1807. When seventeen or eighteen he came to Great Valley, as Judge Chamberlain's clerk, where he remained about five years. In the fall of 1828 he settled in Ellicottville and opened a general store, and was one of the leading merchants until the spring of 1847, when he sold to his brother Stephen and retired to a farm in Great Valley. There he spent the remainder of his life, dying May 12, 1876. He served the town of Great Valley as supervisor in 1865.

Stephen McCOY was born in Seneca, N. Y., Jan. 26, 1817. He became a clerk for his brother Bethuel, and in May, 1847, bought the latter's interest in the store and conducted it until 1875. Mr. McCOY represented Ellicottville as supervisor in 1851 and 1852, the county as treasurer one term, and was loan commissioner two years.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 597

Surnames: McMAHON, DEVEREUX, WALSH, DALEY

John McMAHON, born in. County Clare, Ireland, in 1820, came to America in 1847, reaching Ellicottville with but a sixpence in his pocket. He entered the employ of Hon. John C. DEVEREUX, with whom be continued until the latter's death. Mr. McMAHON came here a stranger, but by untiring industry and excellent business ability he became prominent in the village and county. He was a leading spirit in the organization of the Cattaraugus Railway Company, now the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg railroad, and erected a steam saw-mill in the village where he employed a large number of men. He also owned and conducted a flour and feed-mill and erected several dwellings and stores. Although born in the shadow of the British throne he nevertheless loved freedom and soon was invested with citizenship, but he still had a warm heart for the sufferings of Ireland. He died Aug. 22, 1887. He married Jennie WALSH, also a native of Ireland, who survived him until Nov. 8, 1888. Their surviving children are John D., James W., Daniel P., Thomas P., and Cathleen (Mrs. Martin B. DALEY).

James W. McMAHON is much interested in the affairs of his town and has represented it on the Board of Supervisors nine years. He was the youngest delegate to the national convention that nominated Grover Cleveland for president in 1884 and has been a member of the Democratic State Committee, representing the 34th Congressional District.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 597

Surnames: MOFFIT, CHAPMAN

James MOFFIT was born in Franklinville in Feb., 1843, was reared a farmer, was educated in the common schools and the academy at Genesee, and Oct. 24, 1863, enlisted in Co. G, 64th N. Y. Vols., which a year later was transferred to the 187th Regiment, with which Mr. MOFFIT served to the close of the war, being honorably discharged in July, 1865. He received a gunshot wound and an abrasion of the skin on his right side at Petersburg. In 1865 he married Josephine CHAPMAN and the same year opened a general store in Humphrey Center. In 1877 he was appointed postmaster and served six years. In 1883 he settled in Ellicottville and commenced the publication of the Ellicottville Post, a Republican weekly. Since 1888 his only son has been an equal partner.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 597 & 598

Surnames: NORTHRUP, LANSING

Halsey F. NORTHRUP was born in South New Berlin, Chenango county, in 1844. He obtained a thorough education, especially in mathematics and early engaged in land surveying, civil engineering, and teaching. In the spring of 1868 he came to Ellicottville and taught the Union School one year, and practiced his profession during vacation. He then gave his whole attention to land surveying until 1875, when he began surveying for the oil pipe line companies. In the winter of 1877-78 he was employed by the Tide Water Pipe Line Company. He made the preliminary examination of the route, secured the right of way, made the surveys and maps, and examined the titles of the lands over which the line passes, which has required nearly all his time, much care, and great research. He is still the civil engineer of this company in charge of all surveying, engineering and right of way matters. This great line is 285 miles long, passes in a generally direct line, and the pipe of wrought iron is six inches in diameter. The oil is propelled from seven stations. The greatest altitude above tide water is 2,600 feet at Summit, Potter county, Pa. He purchased about 3000 acres of wild lands in different sections of Cattaraugus county, which he has been selling out in parcels. He owns twenty-one oil wells in Allegany county, which are managed by his partner. He is also the present president of the village of Ellicottville. In 1874 he married Mary LANSING, of Greene, N. Y., and has a son and two daughters.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 598

Surnames: OYER, HAMMOND, DYE, LARABEE

Michael OYER, son of Frederick, was born in Herkimer county about 1802. He early came to Ashford with his father, who as a farmer began at what is now called New Ashford, coming in by marked trees over corduroy roads and pole bridges. The nearest grist-mill was at Springville in Erie county, whither they went in summer with a wood-shod sled drawn by oxen. Frederick OYER resided there until his death; his wife lived to be ninety-nine years of age. Michael OYER married Betsey HAMMOND, of East Otto, and settled near his father soon afterward. Selling out five years later, he settled on a farm partly cleared in East Otto, where he died. He had six daughters and one son. The latter, Joseph OYER, married Delilah DYE in 1863, was a farmer in East Otto, and in 1861 enlisted in Co. A, 7th Ill. Vols., for three months. In 1865 he purchased a half-interest in a general store of his brother-in-law, J. D. LARABEE, in Ashford Hollow, where he was a merchant ten years. In Feb., 1881, he removed to Ellicottville, where he deals in horses and has a livery stable.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 598

Surname: PETTIT

Joshua R. PETTIT, born in Tonawanda, N. Y., Dec. 18, 1839 commenced his business life in Ellicottville in 1860, and Aug. 12, 1862, enlisted in Co. A, 154th N. Y. Vols., serving until the close of the war, being most of the time a sergeant of an ambulance corps. In 1866 he opened a grocery in Ellicottville.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 598

Surnames: PITCHER, WOODRUFF, HURLBURT, HUNTLEY

Orrin PITCHER, a native of Norwich, Mass., married Miranda WOODRUFF in Broome county, N. Y., and settled there about 1807. In 1813 he came to Ellicottville and cut down the timber on about two acres where the village now stands, and returned to his family in Broome county. In the fall he brought his wife and son (David S.) and three daughters to Franklinville, whence in the spring he made a path to Peth in Great Valley and removed to a shanty, which he had built there. In the succeeding winter he occupied the log house of Grove HURLBURT while building a similar residence for himself. His log cabin occupied the site of the old Mansion House, now the Whitney House, and was the first habitation within the village corporation. This place he sold to Daniel HUNTLEY. He eventuaIly removed to Illinois and thence to Iowa, where he spent the last twelve or fifteen years of his life, dying at the age of eighty-four years. His wife died aged over eighty-seven. David S. PITCHER, their oldest son, born in Broome county in 1809 came with his parents to Ellicottville in 1814 and lived to see the wilderness transformed into a thriving town and village. His brother Orlando, born in June, 1816, was the first white male child born in Ellicottville.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 598

Surnames: QUACKENBUSH, BARGY, HINMAN

Clark P. QUACKENBUSH, second son of John and Mary (BARGY) QUACKENBUSH, was born in Ashford, July 7, 1849, and June 7, 1871, married Augusta HINMAN, of his native town, who was born in Mansfield, April 8, 1849. He settled on his father's homestead of 233 acres, which he owned, and where he remained eleven years, when he began keeping hotel in Ashford Hollow. In March, 1883, they settled in Ellicottville. They have three daughters.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 598 & 599

Surnames: RANDALL, DIMMICK, McCOY, SHANNON

Charles P. RANDALL, a native of Chenango county, married Margaret DIMMICK, and as near as can be ascertained made with his bride his first settlement in Mansfield on Fish hill. He cleared a farm and in a few years became an extensive dealer in sheep and cattle. He resided in Mansfield until his death Dec. 31, 1859; Mrs. RANDALL died June 21, 1855.. Children: Mary (Mrs. C. McCOY), who died in 1859; Joseph D., born in Mansfield, June 16, 1836; George, born in June, 1838; Ralph C., born in March, 1840; and Frank W., born May 17, 1846. Joseph D. RANDALL married Charity SHANNON, of Bridgeport, N. Y. He has been a successful business man, has been an inspector of telegraph for the United States Telegraph Company, has owned several star mail routes, has been a grocer, has drilled a number of oil wells, at one time owning nineteen, has dealt in live stock and largely in real estate, and has built a large number of residences. He is now postmaster of Ellicottville. Mr. RANDALL cast his first vote for General Fremont and has been a pronounced Republican since the organization of the party.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 599

Surnames: REED, WAIT

E. T. REED, son of J. W., was born in Ashford, May 29, 1853, and choosing dentistry as a profession became a pupil of Dr. Carlos WAIT, of Springville, N. Y., where he spent two years. He located in Ellicottville in the spring of 1877, where he has since resided, and where he has acquired a flourishing practice. Dr. REED was burned out in the great fire in May, 1890, but quickly became settled in his present handsome quarters.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 599

Surnames: RUST, ELLIS, STANTON, WASHBURN, TODD, KNIGHT, McCOY

Quartus RUST, born in Chester, Mass., Sept. 4, 1790, early learned the carpenter's trade, and about 1815 married Polly ELLIS, who was born Aug. 17, 1792, and who died in January, 1813, leaving an infant son. In 1817 Mr. RUST married Martha STANTON and in 1818 came to Ellicottville. He paid a neighbor $50 to bring his family and their goods to their home in the woods with a yoke of oxen and a heavy wagon, and they were six weeks making the journey. They settled on Bryant hill, where he was a successful pioneer farmer. Mrs. RUST died Nov. 8, 1846. 

Children : 

Quartus Ellis RUST, born in Massachusetts, June 2, 1815 

Lewis RUST, who died in infancy

Lewis S. RUST, born July 25, 1819 who was killed at Second Bull Run 

John W. RUST, born March 11, 1821, was a mechanic and farmer, and died April 26, 1872 

Mary A. RUST, born Jan. 21, 1823, married Howland WASHBURN, and died Nov. 13, 1871

Angeline RUST, born in December, 1830. died July 12, 1842

Edwin R. RUST, born March 31, 1832, a farmer who faithfully cared for his aged parents until their decease, and who now resides with his nephew, Charles C. RUST, in the village. 

Quartus RUST married for his third wife Mrs. Sarah, widow of Lyman TODD, May 8, 1853; he died Sept. 10, 1854, and she May 10, 1884. Mr. RUST was a justice of the peace for twenty-five years. Quartus E. RUST was a cabinet maker by trade and a farmer on the homestead. In 1859 he settled in the village and conducted a cabinet shop and furniture store until his death Sept. 8, 1889. Dec. 19, 1839, he married Electa M. KNIGHT, who died March 17, 1861; she was the mother of all his children: Amelia M., Charles C., and Ellis E. March 3, 1863, Quartus E. RUST married Ann McCOY.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 599 & 600

Surnames: SAXTON, LEONARD, SKINNER

Henry SAXTON was born in Vermont and came to Ellicottville as a clerk in 1817 or '18 for Baker LEONARD, whose widow he married. He died of cholera in Louisville, Ky., in 1834, aged thirty-four years. Mr. SAXTON possessed great energy and large natural resources, and was a leading citizen of the town and county. He was elected sheriff in 1828, which position he resigned at the beginning of the last year of his term. He was a prominent merchant in Ellicottville and had branch stores in Springville and Randolph; he was also an extensive dealer and manufacturer of pine lumber. He leased a mill-site on the Allegheny river where Salamanca now is and there built the first mill, and used the river as a highway to convey his lumber to market. Henry SAXTON was supervisor of Ellicottville in 1828.

Children:

Albert SAXTON, who lives in Sacramento, Cal.

Hannah L. SAXTON, widow of J. King SKINNER, resides on the homestead where she was born, and which now shelters three generations of the family.

Baker Leonard SAXTON, who enlisted in Co. A, 154th N. Y. Vols., for three years, re-enlisted in the 179th N. Y. Regt. as first lieutenant, and was killed in front of Petersburg.

Frederick A. SAXTON, of Washington, D. C.

Walter SAXTON, who died in 1855

Ebenezer SAXTON. 

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 600

Surname: SHEFFIELD

James M. SHEFFIELD, born in Great Valley, March 13, 1847, was raised in Ellicottville, and Sept. 26, 1864, enlisted in Co. F, 43d U. S. Col. Troops, and was honorably discharged Sept. 28, 1865, at Brownville, Texas, receiving in an engagement a permanent injury of his right eye. William H. SHEFFIELD, his father, was a soldier in the 26th U. S. Col. Troops, saw hard service, was disabled from field duty, and was detailed as hospital steward until discharged.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 600

Surnames: SMITH, McINTYRE

Rev. Courtney SMITH; born in Bolton, Warren county, March 21, 1806, died in Ellicottville, Feb. 22, 1884. He received a thorough education, studied theology with his brother, Rev. Reuben SMITH, of Waterford, and later received the degree of A.M. from Middlebury College in Vermont. Mr. SMITH was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Troy, N. Y., Sept. 10, 1834, and was ordained within a year afterward. He entered upon the labors of his profession in his native town, where he remained seven years, and was then in Warrensburgh, N. Y., fourteen years, was the pastor of a church in Grand Rapids, Mich., nearly ten years, and was four years at Portland, Chautauqua county. Mr. SMITH settled in Ellicottville in the fall of 1869, and was duly installed as pastor of the church about a year later. He remained to the close of his life their faithful, efficient, and zealous pastor, and the church prospered under his ministration. He was an argumentative and eloquent sermonizer, an easy and pleasing conversationalist; and the highest type of a Christian gentleman. He had strong and decided convictions of duty and the courage to advocate what he decided was right. Aug. 28, 1828, he married Sarah McINTYRE, of Bolton, who survived him.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 600 -602

Surnames: SMITH, NICHOLS, CLARKE, COLMAN, BEECHER

Theodore SMITH was born in Orwell, Rutland county, Vt., on the 28th of June, 1809. He was the sixth in descent from Rev. Henry SMITH, who came from England an ordained minister and was installed first pastor of the church at Weathersfield, Conn., in 1636, and died in 1648. In the last century the family moved from Connecticut to Vermont, where it soon became noted for its broad minds and independent natures. It furnished from its numbers many men who became prominent in Colonial affairs and in the councils and on the battlefields of the new Republic. Hon. Pliny SMITH, father of Theodore, born in 1761, died in 1840, was the leading mind in northern Vermont in his lifetime, and at different periods was a member of the General Assembly, a State senator, and for many years a justice of the Supreme Court of Vermont. Theodore SMITH was educated at the high school and at the college at Castleton. At the age of twenty-one he married Lucy, daughter of Dr. Asher NICHOLS, and shortly afterward moved to Springville, N. Y., where he began life as a merchant. In 1838 he moved to Ellicottville and entered the office of the Holland Land Company under Mr. CLARKE, whose daughter, Eunice Sarah, he had married, his first wife having died some years previously. In 1843 he was admitted to the bar, but never practiced; the legal training, however, proved of great value to him in later life when, burdened with the care of his own and other estates, he had many complicated interests to protect, and the welfare of widows and orphans depended upon his knowledge of legal duties. In the early thirties the Holland Land Company sold its interests to the Farmers' Loan and Trust Company of New York and the latter some years afterward transferred its title to several private individuals. Among these were Mr. SMITH and Truman R. COLMAN, who since 1843 had been partners in the banking business. They fully appreciated the opportunity which lay before them at this time and purchased over 150,000 acres of land in Cattaraugus and Allegany counties, which they disposed of to the settlers in the same manner as the old company. In 1852 the partnership was dissolved, after which Mr. SMITH remained in Ellicottville disposing of his share of the partnership lands until 1863, when he removed to New York.

Although not a politician and never in office Mr. SMITH took great interest in public affairs. Thoroughly independent in feeling, with ideas founded on long study of political and constitutional writers as well as affairs of the day, he was above and beyond party bias, and followed what seemed to him to be the line of public policy most conducive to the interests of the whole rather than a party or section of the nation. Previous to 1860 he had taken no active part in matters of public interest beyond the discussion incident to a political campaign, and then only to express briefly his views upon the point at issue. But in that year the question of the conservation of the Union, the fatuity of the doctrine of States rights, and the attempt to abolish a system that was contrary to the basal idea of the constitution stirred within him the spirit he had inherited from his Puritan ancestors. He resolved to do his duty to his country so far as it lay within his power. Prevented by physical weakness from serving at the front he directed his energies towards supplying the material with which the struggle was to be won. With a thoroughness which was a characteristic feature, he went to Washington and familiarized himself with the detail of army life which was to be seen in the great army then encamped near the capital during the period of McClellan's campaign. He likewise visited the various departments of the government and was favored with an interview with the president. At the second call for troops in 1861 Mr. SMITH gave his time to the raising of volunteers and the organization of regiments for service. He canvassed Cattaraugus county from end to end, exhorting the people both publicly and privately to do their part for the Union. When companies were formed in the various towns he cheered the departing volunteers with inspiring and patriotic words. Ordinarily of an undemonstrative and unimpassioned manner he became at such inspiring moments a fascinating and brilliant speaker, and through the fervor of his addresses and the earnestness of his manner stirred the enthusiasm of the men of the county to give their best efforts for the Union. In 1863 Mr. SMITH went to New York, spending his time between that city and Cattaraugus county until the end of the war, when he moved to Buffalo, where he lived until his death, Jan. 12, 1883. About the time of his removal to Buffalo he gradually began to give up active business, leaving his interests in the hands of his son, Archibald Clarke SMITH, and devoted the remainder of his years to his books and to travel. In 1868 he suffered a severe loss by the death of his only daughter, Lucy NICHOLS, wife of James Curtis BEECHER. In time the infirmities of age became too strong to permit an active life, and, surrounded by his family and guiding the development of a younger generation grown up beside him, he passed his last years among the comforts and blessings to which an energetic and benevolent life entitled him. His wife, the eldest daughter of Hon. Staley Nichols CLARKE, as perfect a woman as her father was a man, and whose motherly kindness many have cause to bless, has survived Mr. SMITH many years.

Mr. SMITH was a man of great breadth of character and depth of mind. Fond of study, he devoted his spare moments to his library and was a writer not only of the spirited addresses delivered during the war, but of many short stories and critical essays of literary worth. Combined with these talents were a fund of dry humor and the faculty of easy expression, all of which made him fascinating and instructive in conversation; men left him feeling charmed and elevated by his presence. Of Puritan stock he was naturally severe and critical, but once convinced of the merit of a man there was no more steadfast friend than he. He was charitable and kind, convinced that it was no merit but the pleasantest of duties to serve and make others happy. He was a man of great business capacity, whose foresight and sagacity brought his many interests through dangerous crises, and seized the opportunity where a wrong step would not only have ruined himself, but brought desolation to the many who trusted him.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 602

Surnames: SOMERVILLE, HILL

William SOMERVILLE, son of James, was born in Dalkeith, Scotland, in March, 1797. His father was a miller; William was a stone cutter. In 1817 he came to America and went to Washington, D. C., where he was employed on the capitol over two years. Returning to Europe he married, in London, in March, 1822, Hannah HILL, and brought his bride to Washington, where he was employed on the White House. Remaining there until the completion of the national buildings he returned to New York, where he conducted shops of his own until 1842, when he came to Ellicottville and settled on the farm where his son, Henry SOMERVILLE, now lives, in Somerville valley, so named in his honor. He died in 1859; his wife died in 1852. Mr. SOMERVILLE was a member of the Baptist church. He had ten children who came to "The Valley" with their parents; only five are living. Henry SOMERVILLE succeeded his father on the hornestead. He was supervisor of Ellicottville in 1892 and was re-elected in 1893.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 602

Surnames: STAUNTON, BREWSTER, STAUNTON

John W. STAUNTON and his wife, Sally BREWSTER, were born in Massachusetts and soon after their marriage removed to Nunda, N. Y. In March, 1820, with three children and all their household goods loaded in a heavy covered wagon drawn by two yoke of oxen, they came to Ellicottville and settled on a farm. He died here at the house now the home of the widow of Dr. J. B. STAUNTON, Dec. 13, 1858. Mr. STAUNTON was a well educated gentleman of dignified deportment whose integrity was above question. He was the first town clerk of Ellicottville in 1821, was supervisor in 1823, 1824, 1825, and 1829, and was clerk of Cattaraugus county from Jan. 2, 1826, to Jan. 1, 1838.

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Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 602

Surname: STOKES

William STOKES, son of Michael STOKES, was born in Limerick, Ireland, in 1849; in 1856 his parents came to America, and in 1861 he settled with them on a farm in the north part of Ellicottville. At the age of twenty-seven he became a carpenter, and almost continually since then has been engaged as a contractor and builder, employing from twelve to twenty men. Mr. STOKES is a skillful mechanic and drafts his own work. The Union school building in Ellicottville, the new Crawford House, the Catholic church at Suspension Bridge, the Congregational church at Kane, Pa., the Catholic church at Tonawanda, and numerous residences are monuments to his skill.

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TYLER Family of Ellicottville

Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Pages 600 - 602

Surname: TYLER

Asher TYLER became land agent for the Devereux tract in 1836, and during his residence in Ellicottville he was elected to Congress. He was a man who commanded universal respect and possessed remarkable ability. He subsequently removed to Elmira and was appointed land agent of the Erie railroad, and died there in 1875. "He knew the Indian when as yet the white man's mastery over lands west of Schenectady was only in process of recognition."

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VAUGHAN Family of Ellicottville

Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 603

Surnames: VAUGHAN, ROOD, LITCHFIELD

Joseph VAUGHAN, of English descent, married Lydia ROOD and in 1810 removed to Pennsylvania. In 1822 they settled in the woods on Bryant hill and about 1830 located in Somerville valley, where they spent the remainder of their lives. Mr. VAUGHAN was a blacksmith before he came to Ellicottville. He had twelve children, nine of whom grew to maturity. Joseph Millen VAUGHAN, their first child, born in Massachusetts, May 21, 1808 married Polly LITCHFIELD, of Ellicottville, Feb. 17, 1832, who was born in Chesterfield, Mass., Sept. 6, 1811. They settled on a woodland farm adjoining his father's place, where Mrs., VAUGHAN still resides. Mr. VAUGHAN died Jan. 13, 1870. Their eleven children all grew to maturity.

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WALRATH Family of Ellicottville

Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 603

Surnames: WALRATH, RICHARDS, CHASE

Walter WALRATH, son of David and Elizabeth WALRATH, was born in Manheim, Herkimer county, Aug. 28, 1826, and in 1844 came to Cattaraugus county. In Dec., 1852, he married Mary RICHARDS and in 1856 settled on a farm near Great Valley Center, which he still owns. He enlisted in the Union army in 1862, leaving his wife and four helpless children, the youngest an infant only six days old. He followed the vicissitudes of the 154th Regiment three years, except that he was a prisoner four months, and escaped without a wound, but had several hair-breadth escapes. A bullet passed through his cap and clipped a lock of his hair, and again his gun was shivered in pieces in his hands. In 1865 he was discharged and is now leading a retired life in the village of Ellicottville. His children are Adelaide (Mrs. J. CHASE), Nelson D., Dr. Charles M. (see Medical Chapter), Walter D., and John C.

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WEIR Family of Ellicottville

Bio from:

Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893

History of the Town of Ellicottville – Chapter XXVI (26)

Page 603

Surnames: WEIR, BEEBE

A. Spencer WEIR married Lucretia BEEBE and settled on a farm in Freedom in 1836. He was an exemplary citizen and died there in 1888; Mrs. WEIR died in 1877. Their oldest son, Charles A. WEIR, born in 1852, received an academic education, learned the mercantile business, and at the age of twenty years became a general merchant in Arcade. A year later he removed to Yorkshire Center and in 1889 settled in Ellicottville, opening a furniture store and an undertaking establishment. His maternal grandfather, Charles BEEBE, was a very early pioneer of Freedom. In his early manhood he built a log house in the woods and brought to this home his young wife and their first-born child. He resided in Freedom until the approach of old age, when he and his wife retired to Arcade, where they died.
 

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